Maternal Anxiety and Depression Following a Premature Infants' Discharge from the NICU: An Integrative Model of the COPE Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148740
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maternal Anxiety and Depression Following a Premature Infants' Discharge from the NICU: An Integrative Model of the COPE Program
Abstract:
Maternal Anxiety and Depression Following a Premature Infants' Discharge from the NICU: An Integrative Model of the COPE Program
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University College of Nursing & Healthcare Innovation
Title:Dean and Distinguished Foundation Professor in Nursing
Co-Authors:Nancy Fischbeck Feinstein, RNC, PhD; Eileen K. Fairbanks, MS, RN, PNP; Linda Alpert-Gillis, PhD; Hugh Crean, PhD
[Symposium scientific presentation] Purpose:  Improving outcomes of low-birth-weight premature infants and their parents with theory-based reproducible intervention programs is urgently needed due to the host of adverse negative physical and mental health outcomes associated with prematurity. The purpose of this study was to test a theoretical model examining the processes through which an evidence-based educational-behavioral intervention program (COPE) influences maternal anxiety and depression 2 months following discharge of their premature infants from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Methods: Mothers of 246 low-birth-weight (LBW) infants were randomized to COPE or control conditions. Maternal measures included parental beliefs, trait and state anxiety, stress in the NICU, and depression. Observers blind to study group rated maternal-infant interaction in the NICU. Results: Structural equation modeling suggested the model tested provided a reasonable fit of the model to the data (c2 (64 df) = 97.67; p = .004; RMSEA = .046; CFI = .97).  Participation in the COPE program was both directly and indirectly, via associations with parental beliefs and maternal depression/anxiety in the NICU, related to mothers? post-hospital depression/anxiety.  Participation in the COPE program was also directly associated with higher mother-infant interaction scores.  Maternal levels of stress in the NICU, however, were not related to participation in the COPE intervention nor to mother-infant interaction or to maternal post-hospital depression/anxiety.  Implications, limitations, and future directions of the study are discussed.Conclusions and Implications: Implementation of COPE could lessen post-discharge anxiety and depression for mothers of LBW premature infants, which in turn, could improve outcomes for a high risk population of infants. Understanding the processes through which interventions work is necessary for the effective translation of efficacious interventions into clinical practice settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaternal Anxiety and Depression Following a Premature Infants' Discharge from the NICU: An Integrative Model of the COPE Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148740-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Maternal Anxiety and Depression Following a Premature Infants' Discharge from the NICU: An Integrative Model of the COPE Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University College of Nursing &amp; Healthcare Innovation</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean and Distinguished Foundation Professor in Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Bernadette.Melnyk@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nancy Fischbeck Feinstein, RNC, PhD; Eileen K. Fairbanks, MS, RN, PNP; Linda Alpert-Gillis, PhD; Hugh Crean, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Symposium scientific presentation] Purpose: &nbsp;Improving outcomes of low-birth-weight premature infants and their parents with theory-based reproducible intervention programs is urgently needed due to the host of adverse negative physical and mental health outcomes associated with prematurity. The purpose of this study was to test a theoretical model examining the processes through which an evidence-based educational-behavioral intervention program (COPE) influences maternal anxiety and depression 2 months following discharge of their premature infants from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Methods: Mothers of 246 low-birth-weight (LBW) infants were randomized to COPE or control conditions. Maternal measures included parental beliefs, trait and state anxiety, stress in the NICU, and depression. Observers blind to study group rated maternal-infant interaction in the NICU. Results: Structural equation modeling suggested the model tested provided a reasonable fit of the model to the data (c2 (64 df) = 97.67; p = .004; RMSEA = .046; CFI = .97).&nbsp; Participation in the COPE program was both directly and indirectly, via associations with parental beliefs and maternal depression/anxiety in the NICU, related to mothers? post-hospital depression/anxiety.&nbsp; Participation in the COPE program was also directly associated with higher mother-infant interaction scores.&nbsp; Maternal levels of stress in the NICU, however, were not related to participation in the COPE intervention nor to mother-infant interaction or to maternal post-hospital depression/anxiety.&nbsp; Implications, limitations, and future directions of the study are discussed.Conclusions and Implications: Implementation of COPE could lessen post-discharge anxiety and depression for mothers of LBW premature infants, which in turn, could improve outcomes for a high risk population of infants. Understanding the processes through which interventions work is necessary for the effective translation of efficacious interventions into clinical practice settings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:49:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:49:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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