2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148764
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Influencing on Nurse Fatigue
Abstract:
Factors Influencing on Nurse Fatigue
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Oumtanee, Areewan, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Chulalongkorn University
Co-Authors:Kantaporn Yodchai, RN, MSN
[Special invitation presentation] Fatigue is a significant threat to patient safety and nurse retention. However, nurse fatigue is an ignore issue although nurses voice that they often work very hard. There has been little known about the level of fatigue of Thai nurses working in a unit. Thus, the purposes of this study  were to identify the level of nurse fatigue, relating variables, and predictors of fatigue of staff nurses in Thailand. Three hundred and seventy-eight staff nurses working in a tertiary hospital were selected in the study. Variables selected to study were personal factor (age), work factors (sufficient staffing and rotation shifts), quality of sleep, sleepinees, and fatique. Study instruments were personal factor, work factors, Epworth Sleepiness Score, Quality of Sleep Scale, and  Fatique Scale. Those scales were tested for content validity and internal reliability. The reliability with alpha chronbach of  Epworth Sleepiness Score, Quality of Sleep Scale, and Fatique Scale were .88, .82, and.95, respectively. All data were analyzed by using mean, standard deviation, t-test, and stepwise regression. The major findings were as follows: 1. The mean scores of fatigue  were moderate level (mean = 4.36, SD = 1.8,   moderate level =  ranging scores from 4.00-6.99) .2. Rotation shifts were not related to fatigue. 3. Sleepiness was positively related to fatigue (r = .311).  4. Quality of sleep, sufficient staffing, and age  were negatively retated to fatigue (r = -.530, -.190  and -.187 respectively) . 5. The predictors of fatigue were quality of sleep, sleepiness, and sufficient staffing. Those accounted for 35.4 % of variance.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Influencing on Nurse Fatigueen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148764-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Influencing on Nurse Fatigue</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Oumtanee, Areewan, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Chulalongkorn University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">areeday@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kantaporn Yodchai, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Special invitation presentation] Fatigue is a significant threat to patient safety and nurse retention. However, nurse fatigue is an ignore issue although nurses voice that they often work very hard.&nbsp;There has been little known about the level of fatigue of Thai nurses working in a unit.&nbsp;Thus, the purposes of this study&nbsp; were to identify the level of nurse fatigue, relating variables,&nbsp;and predictors of fatigue of staff nurses in Thailand. Three hundred and seventy-eight staff nurses working in a&nbsp;tertiary hospital&nbsp;were selected in the study.&nbsp;Variables selected to study were personal factor (age), work factors (sufficient staffing and rotation shifts), quality of sleep, sleepinees, and fatique. Study instruments were personal factor, work factors, Epworth Sleepiness Score, Quality of Sleep Scale, and&nbsp; Fatique Scale. Those scales were tested for content validity and internal reliability. The reliability with alpha chronbach of&nbsp; Epworth Sleepiness Score, Quality of Sleep Scale, and&nbsp;Fatique Scale were .88, .82, and.95, respectively.&nbsp;All data were analyzed by using mean, standard deviation, t-test, and stepwise&nbsp;regression.&nbsp;The major findings were as follows: 1. The mean scores of fatigue &nbsp;were moderate level (mean = 4.36, SD = 1.8,&nbsp;&nbsp; moderate level =&nbsp; ranging scores from 4.00-6.99) .2.&nbsp;Rotation shifts&nbsp;were not related to fatigue. 3.&nbsp;Sleepiness&nbsp;was positively related to fatigue (r = .311).&nbsp; 4. Quality of sleep, sufficient staffing, and age&nbsp; were negatively retated to fatigue&nbsp;(r = -.530, -.190&nbsp; and -.187 respectively) . 5.&nbsp;The predictors of fatigue were quality of sleep, sleepiness, and sufficient staffing.&nbsp;Those accounted for 35.4 % of variance.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:50:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:50:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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