Ambulatory Blood Pressure (ABP) and Heart Rate (HR) Responses in African-American (AA) Women: Environmental Effects

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148774
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ambulatory Blood Pressure (ABP) and Heart Rate (HR) Responses in African-American (AA) Women: Environmental Effects
Abstract:
Ambulatory Blood Pressure (ABP) and Heart Rate (HR) Responses in African-American (AA) Women: Environmental Effects
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Picot, Sandra J., PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Maryland
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Erika Friedmann, PhD
[Scientific session research presentation] Theoretical framework: The allostasis & allostatic load model theorizes individuals' experiences of stress from their environment directly & indirectly (via perceptions) influences ABP & HR responses. DESIGN: Cross-sectional SAMPLE: Random sample of 407 community women Variables: Dependent: awake/sleep systolic BP/diastolic BP, HR; Predictors: living arrangement (0 = alone, 1 = with older adult), marital & employment status (0 = No, 1 = Yes); Perceptions: stress (1-10 cm scale); Covariates: age, exercise (minutes/week), waist circumference (cm). Methods: After obtaining informed consent, nurses conducted interviews, attached the ambulatory BP-HR monitor and explained the diary to participants. BP-HR were recorded every 30 minutes 6AM-10PM (awake) and 60 minutes 10PM to 6AM (sleep). Awake participants recorded times, body position, activity each time an ABP was measured. Separate hierarchical linear regressions with age, exercise, & waist circumference entered in the first step; stress in the second step; and living arrangement, marital status, and employment status in the final step were conducted for each awake & sleep ABP and HR. FINDINGS: DESCRIPTIVES: 57.2% lived with older adults, 53.3% married, 47.7% employed; awake & sleep SBP, respectively 132.56 (16.13), 122.40 (16.80); awake & sleep DBP, respectively 78.9 (8.96), 68.64 (9.45); awake & sleep HR, respectively 80.80 (10.73), 73.06 (10.46); stress 3.70 (3.07); age 55.86 (13.48); exercise 193.60 (179.36); waist 94.80 (13.92). RESULTS: ?Age, ?waist, & single explained 18.6% of SBP awake. ?Age & single explained 16.2% of SBP sleep. Neither the awake nor sleep DBP models were significant. Age ?stress, & employment explained 11.4% of HR awake. Age, exercise, ?waist, ?stress, & employment explained 11.1% of HR sleep. CONCLUSIONS: Findings supported the allostasis & allostatic model: The environment directly and indirectly (via perceptions) affected BP & HR. Findings are relevant to future research in & interventions for managing stress responses in AA women subgroups.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAmbulatory Blood Pressure (ABP) and Heart Rate (HR) Responses in African-American (AA) Women: Environmental Effectsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148774-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Ambulatory Blood Pressure (ABP) and Heart Rate (HR) Responses in African-American (AA) Women: Environmental Effects</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Picot, Sandra J., PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Maryland</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">picot@son.umaryland.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Erika Friedmann, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Theoretical framework: The allostasis &amp; allostatic load model theorizes individuals' experiences of stress from their environment directly &amp; indirectly (via perceptions) influences ABP &amp; HR responses. DESIGN: Cross-sectional SAMPLE: Random sample of 407 community women Variables: Dependent: awake/sleep systolic BP/diastolic BP, HR; Predictors: living arrangement (0 = alone, 1 = with older adult), marital &amp; employment status (0 = No, 1 = Yes); Perceptions: stress (1-10 cm scale); Covariates: age, exercise (minutes/week), waist circumference (cm). Methods: After obtaining informed consent, nurses conducted interviews, attached the ambulatory BP-HR monitor and explained the diary to participants. BP-HR were recorded every 30 minutes 6AM-10PM (awake) and 60 minutes 10PM to 6AM (sleep). Awake participants recorded times, body position, activity each time an ABP was measured. Separate hierarchical linear regressions with age, exercise, &amp; waist circumference entered in the first step; stress in the second step; and living arrangement, marital status, and employment status in the final step were conducted for each awake &amp; sleep ABP and HR. FINDINGS: DESCRIPTIVES: 57.2% lived with older adults, 53.3% married, 47.7% employed; awake &amp; sleep SBP, respectively 132.56 (16.13), 122.40 (16.80); awake &amp; sleep DBP, respectively 78.9 (8.96), 68.64 (9.45); awake &amp; sleep HR, respectively 80.80 (10.73), 73.06 (10.46); stress 3.70 (3.07); age 55.86 (13.48); exercise 193.60 (179.36); waist 94.80 (13.92). RESULTS: ?Age, ?waist, &amp; single explained 18.6% of SBP awake. ?Age &amp; single explained 16.2% of SBP sleep. Neither the awake nor sleep DBP models were significant. Age ?stress, &amp; employment explained 11.4% of HR awake. Age, exercise, ?waist, ?stress, &amp; employment explained 11.1% of HR sleep. CONCLUSIONS: Findings supported the allostasis &amp; allostatic model: The environment directly and indirectly (via perceptions) affected BP &amp; HR. Findings are relevant to future research in &amp; interventions for managing stress responses in AA women subgroups.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:50:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:50:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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