2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148780
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Violence and Pregnancy in Mexico
Abstract:
Violence and Pregnancy in Mexico
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Quelopana, Ana, PhD, RMW
P.I. Institution Name:Universidad de Tarapaca
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Jane Dimmitt Champion, PhD, FNP, CS, FAAN; Bertha Cecilia Salazar, PhD
[Scientific session research presentation] Aim: This study examined the association between a history of interpersonal violence (IPV) attitudes toward pregnancy and initiation of prenatal care (PNC). Methods: Pregnant women (n=253) aged 13 to 46 years receiving their first prenatal care visit at a public prenatal clinic in Monterrey, Mexico were enrolled in the study. Structured interviews were conducted to obtain information concerning demographics, reproductive history, current pregnancy, attitudes toward pregnancy, IPV history and perceived barriers and benefits of PNC. Findings: Thirty-five percent of participants reported IPV. A current or previous husband or partner was the most common perpetrator of violence (64%). Of women experiencing abuse, 47% reported abuse was ongoing during the current pregnancy. More women reporting IPV were unmarried, did not live with a partner and reported a lower monthly income. Women with IPV initiated PNC later and reported more problems with previous pregnancies than those without IPV history. An experience of IPV was associated with initiation of PNC, number of pregnancies, perception of barriers, and negative attitudes toward pregnancy. Conclusions: Many women in this study reported a previously unreported experience of IPV or were currently in an IPV relationship. These women perceived more barriers and initiated prenatal care later than women without IPV. They also had more negative attitudes toward the pregnancy. These factors potentially cause adverse pregnancy outcomes. The prenatal clinical setting utilized in this study could be easily adapted for practice settings in Mexico leading to increased screening of pregnant women for IVP for prevention of adverse pregnancy outcomes. .
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleViolence and Pregnancy in Mexicoen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148780-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Violence and Pregnancy in Mexico</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Quelopana, Ana, PhD, RMW</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Universidad de Tarapaca</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">aquelopa@uta.cl</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jane Dimmitt Champion, PhD, FNP, CS, FAAN; Bertha Cecilia Salazar, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Aim: This study examined the association between a history of interpersonal violence (IPV) attitudes toward pregnancy and initiation of prenatal care (PNC). Methods: Pregnant women (n=253) aged 13 to 46 years receiving their first prenatal care visit at a public prenatal clinic in Monterrey, Mexico were enrolled in the study. Structured interviews were conducted to obtain information concerning demographics, reproductive history, current pregnancy, attitudes toward pregnancy, IPV history and perceived barriers and benefits of PNC. Findings: Thirty-five percent of participants reported IPV. A current or previous husband or partner was the most common perpetrator of violence (64%). Of women experiencing abuse, 47% reported abuse was ongoing during the current pregnancy. More women reporting IPV were unmarried, did not live with a partner and reported a lower monthly income. Women with IPV initiated PNC later and reported more problems with previous pregnancies than those without IPV history. An experience of IPV was associated with initiation of PNC, number of pregnancies, perception of barriers, and negative attitudes toward pregnancy. Conclusions: Many women in this study reported a previously unreported experience of IPV or were currently in an IPV relationship. These women perceived more barriers and initiated prenatal care later than women without IPV. They also had more negative attitudes toward the pregnancy. These factors potentially cause adverse pregnancy outcomes. The prenatal clinical setting utilized in this study could be easily adapted for practice settings in Mexico leading to increased screening of pregnant women for IVP for prevention of adverse pregnancy outcomes. .</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:50:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:50:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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