Creating a Nursing Mentorship Program for High School Research Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148782
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Creating a Nursing Mentorship Program for High School Research Students
Abstract:
Creating a Nursing Mentorship Program for High School Research Students
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Santora, Carolyn, RN, MS
P.I. Institution Name:SUNY Stony Brook
Title:Associate Director for Critical Care
Co-Authors:Kathleen M. Shurpin, PhD, RN, NP-C, ONC
Background: The nursing shortage is impacted by multiple career choices. Nursing competes with the traditional areas of medicine, teaching, and business, and with fields that have opened up as a result of computer technology, including information sciences, computer graphics, and multimedia. Nursing as a career choice is something that many young men and women are not exposed to. Nursing as a scholarly pursuit is an area that many are not familiar with. Purpose: To create a process that advances the concept of nursing as an important and scholarly career while providing opportunities for nursing leaders to perform community service and encourage research. Methods: An STT Kappa Gamma member on faculty at StonyBrook School of Nursing partnered with a local high school to mentor a student enrolled in the science research course. University faculty had, over the years, served as mentors, but no student had ever been associated with the nursing school. In fact, the research teacher was not aware that nurses held PhD's or did research. The student conferred with the nursing faculty mentor weekly. The mentor guided the project, helped obtain clinical placement, supervised an IRB proposal and assisted in analysis of the resulting data. Results: The research resulted in a local award, acceptance of a poster abstract at a national conference (funded by Kappa Gamma), and submission to the Intel Science Competition. The most important result, however, was that the student, high school faculty, and the entire research class were exposed to nursing as a scholarly profession. The research presentation in regional forums exposed a large community to the scientific method as applied to nursing research. Conclusion: Implementing collaborative relationships between university nursing faculty and community school research programs will benefit the school and provide a forum to expose young men and women to nursing as scholarly career.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCreating a Nursing Mentorship Program for High School Research Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148782-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Creating a Nursing Mentorship Program for High School Research Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Santora, Carolyn, RN, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">SUNY Stony Brook</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Director for Critical Care</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">csantora@notes.cc.sunysb.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathleen M. Shurpin, PhD, RN, NP-C, ONC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: The nursing shortage is impacted by multiple career choices. Nursing competes with the traditional areas of medicine, teaching, and business, and with fields that have opened up as a result of computer technology, including information sciences, computer graphics, and multimedia. Nursing as a career choice is something that many young men and women are not exposed to. Nursing as a scholarly pursuit is an area that many are not familiar with. Purpose: To create a process that advances the concept of nursing as an important and scholarly career while providing opportunities for nursing leaders to perform community service and encourage research. Methods: An STT Kappa Gamma member on faculty at StonyBrook School of Nursing partnered with a local high school to mentor a student enrolled in the science research course. University faculty had, over the years, served as mentors, but no student had ever been associated with the nursing school. In fact, the research teacher was not aware that nurses held PhD's or did research. The student conferred with the nursing faculty mentor weekly. The mentor guided the project, helped obtain clinical placement, supervised an IRB proposal and assisted in analysis of the resulting data. Results: The research resulted in a local award, acceptance of a poster abstract at a national conference (funded by Kappa Gamma), and submission to the Intel Science Competition. The most important result, however, was that the student, high school faculty, and the entire research class were exposed to nursing as a scholarly profession. The research presentation in regional forums exposed a large community to the scientific method as applied to nursing research. Conclusion: Implementing collaborative relationships between university nursing faculty and community school research programs will benefit the school and provide a forum to expose young men and women to nursing as scholarly career.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:50:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:50:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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