2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148794
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Partner-Delivered Reflexology: Effects on Cancer Pain
Abstract:
Partner-Delivered Reflexology: Effects on Cancer Pain
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Stephenson, Nancy L., RN, PhD, CS
P.I. Institution Name:East Carolina University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Melvin S. Swanson, PhD
Pain management continues to be a priority for patients and their families. The complementary and alternative therapy of reflexology is being used for pain relief although empirical evidence of its effectiveness is minimal. Recent pilot studies with cancer patients who had metastases found an immediate effect from reflexology on pain. While reflexology is Eastern in origin, the current use of reflexology for pain relief is based on the Western neuromatrix theory of pain, which is an expansion of the Gate Control Theory. Since most cancer patients are currently being cared for in the home, this research examines the effectiveness of reflexology and the best way to integrate this therapy into traditional care in the home. Pain is being measured with the Brief Pain Inventory and Short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire, substituting the 0-10 scale recommended by the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations for the Present Pain Intensity. Patient and partner's evaluation of the partner's self-efficacy to manage the patient's cancer pain with partner-delivered reflexology is being measured with visual analgogue scales for self-efficacy of partner-delivered reflexology. Partner-delivered reflexology is taught during the patient's hospitalization/outpatient visit, delivered a minimum of 3 times a week for 4 weeks immediately following hospital discharge/outpatient visit, with baseline measurements in the hospital, at Week 1 and at Week 4 at home, and a follow-up descriptive evaluation at Week 8. Equianalgesic dosing is being calculated. Analyses of covariance is being used to compared adjusted pain intensity means between the intervention and control groups, and descriptive analyses is being used to explain follow-up evaluation of patients' experiences with partner-delivered foot reflexology. If reflexology is effective, teaching partners this noninvasive therapy could become part of standard care at no cost other than partner instruction. Funded by: NIH R21 CA 105432
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePartner-Delivered Reflexology: Effects on Cancer Painen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148794-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Partner-Delivered Reflexology: Effects on Cancer Pain</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stephenson, Nancy L., RN, PhD, CS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">East Carolina University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">stephensonn@mail.ecu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Melvin S. Swanson, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Pain management continues to be a priority for patients and their families. The complementary and alternative therapy of reflexology is being used for pain relief although empirical evidence of its effectiveness is minimal. Recent pilot studies with cancer patients who had metastases found an immediate effect from reflexology on pain. While reflexology is Eastern in origin, the current use of reflexology for pain relief is based on the Western neuromatrix theory of pain, which is an expansion of the Gate Control Theory. Since most cancer patients are currently being cared for in the home, this research examines the effectiveness of reflexology and the best way to integrate this therapy into traditional care in the home. Pain is being measured with the Brief Pain Inventory and Short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire, substituting the 0-10 scale recommended by the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations for the Present Pain Intensity. Patient and partner's evaluation of the partner's self-efficacy to manage the patient's cancer pain with partner-delivered reflexology is being measured with visual analgogue scales for self-efficacy of partner-delivered reflexology. Partner-delivered reflexology is taught during the patient's hospitalization/outpatient visit, delivered a minimum of 3 times a week for 4 weeks immediately following hospital discharge/outpatient visit, with baseline measurements in the hospital, at Week 1 and at Week 4 at home, and a follow-up descriptive evaluation at Week 8. Equianalgesic dosing is being calculated. Analyses of covariance is being used to compared adjusted pain intensity means between the intervention and control groups, and descriptive analyses is being used to explain follow-up evaluation of patients' experiences with partner-delivered foot reflexology. If reflexology is effective, teaching partners this noninvasive therapy could become part of standard care at no cost other than partner instruction. Funded by: NIH R21 CA 105432</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:50:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:50:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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