2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148795
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family Adaptation to Hereditary Cancer Risk
Abstract:
Family Adaptation to Hereditary Cancer Risk
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Stockard Spelic, Stephanie, MSN, RN, CS-BC, LMHP
P.I. Institution Name:Creighton University
Title:Assistant Professor of Nursing
Co-Authors:Joan Norris, RN, PhD, FAAN; Susan Tinley, MS, RN, CGC
Abstract: Family Adaptation to Hereditary Cancer Risk Aims: This pilot, qualitative study was designed to initiate interviews, test and refine transcription and data analysis procedures, and begin to explore unanswered questions about adaptation of individuals and families adapting to hereditary cancer risk. Significance: At-risk persons may avoid testing or obtaining their results and often do not follow up with screening and preventive interventions. No family studies have addressed the experience. A grounded theory study can inform education, support strategies and genetic counseling outcomes. Sample: Five families of parents and their offspring (ages 15-24) were purposively sampled. Methods: All participants responded to broad questions, recalling their first awareness of the cancer risk, if they decided to find out about their individual risk status, how risk was communicated to family members and others, effects on their lives, and views about their adjustment. The constant comparative method was used in data analysis as described by Strauss and Corbin. Findings: Themes that emerged related to a basic social process of intergenerational vulnerability. Tentatively, this incorporated living with awareness of cancer risk, varied individual and family responses, and the factors which influenced those responses. These included ages and meanings around initial awareness, accuracy of information, and nature of family communication and decision making. Communication about risk ranged from open disclosure to selective and closed communication styles. Key decisions focused on whether to be tested, to obtain results, to ignore or cope with the risk, and whether to select intensive screening or active prophylaxis. Feelings of vulnerability varied by gender, age and experiences. Participants recommended ongoing counseling throughout the genetic testing or cancer episodes and afterwards and provision of support groups. A future study will continue individual phone interviews and in-person videotaped family interviews. The sample will be purposively expanded until saturation is reached.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily Adaptation to Hereditary Cancer Risken_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148795-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family Adaptation to Hereditary Cancer Risk</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stockard Spelic, Stephanie, MSN, RN, CS-BC, LMHP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Creighton University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ssspelic@creighton.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joan Norris, RN, PhD, FAAN; Susan Tinley, MS, RN, CGC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Abstract: Family Adaptation to Hereditary Cancer Risk Aims: This pilot, qualitative study was designed to initiate interviews, test and refine transcription and data analysis procedures, and begin to explore unanswered questions about adaptation of individuals and families adapting to hereditary cancer risk. Significance: At-risk persons may avoid testing or obtaining their results and often do not follow up with screening and preventive interventions. No family studies have addressed the experience. A grounded theory study can inform education, support strategies and genetic counseling outcomes. Sample: Five families of parents and their offspring (ages 15-24) were purposively sampled. Methods: All participants responded to broad questions, recalling their first awareness of the cancer risk, if they decided to find out about their individual risk status, how risk was communicated to family members and others, effects on their lives, and views about their adjustment. The constant comparative method was used in data analysis as described by Strauss and Corbin. Findings: Themes that emerged related to a basic social process of intergenerational vulnerability. Tentatively, this incorporated living with awareness of cancer risk, varied individual and family responses, and the factors which influenced those responses. These included ages and meanings around initial awareness, accuracy of information, and nature of family communication and decision making. Communication about risk ranged from open disclosure to selective and closed communication styles. Key decisions focused on whether to be tested, to obtain results, to ignore or cope with the risk, and whether to select intensive screening or active prophylaxis. Feelings of vulnerability varied by gender, age and experiences. Participants recommended ongoing counseling throughout the genetic testing or cancer episodes and afterwards and provision of support groups. A future study will continue individual phone interviews and in-person videotaped family interviews. The sample will be purposively expanded until saturation is reached.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:50:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:50:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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