Brainstorming: Cultivating Innovative Ideas for Evidence-Based Nursing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148808
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Brainstorming: Cultivating Innovative Ideas for Evidence-Based Nursing
Abstract:
Brainstorming: Cultivating Innovative Ideas for Evidence-Based Nursing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Vratny, Amy J., RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Mayo Clinic
Title:Nursing Education Specialist
Co-Authors:Teri Britt Pipe, PhD, RN
Purpose: Describe innovations that emerged as a strategy for fostering an environment conducive to using research in professional nursing practice. Methods: The Nursing Research Subcommittee (NRS) at Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona, has incorporated leadership strategies that support diffusion of innovation. The first step was implementation of a non-traditional brainstorming session. The goal of the brainstorming session was to generate multiple ideas for how to create the best environment for research in nursing practice. This process generated 117 ideas in 50 minutes. From that list, the committee prioritized the most promising strategies and decided upon two projects that would meet the goal of creating such an environment. Both strategies share the goal of empowering direct care nurses to evaluate, use, and promote research in professional practice. ?Nursing Research 101? is a series of continuing education opportunities whereby nurses learn about how nursing research supports a professional practice environment. Experts from the community as well as within the organization share expertise in a non-threatening approach. Nursing Research Champions are ?super-users? who encourage nursing research in their individual nursing departments and units and serve as liaisons to the committee. Recognition and professional challenge are strong motivators for continued participation and growth. Outcomes: The outcomes of these two innovative projects include a stronger and more widespread influence of research in diverse practice settings, guided by direct care nurses. Five ongoing educational sessions have been developed and offered with CEUs. To date, over 30 Nursing Research Champions have been identified. As a leadership strategy, the brainstorming process was instrumental in advancing leadership skills and opportunities for committee members and clinical nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBrainstorming: Cultivating Innovative Ideas for Evidence-Based Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148808-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Brainstorming: Cultivating Innovative Ideas for Evidence-Based Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vratny, Amy J., RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mayo Clinic</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing Education Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vratny.amy@mayo.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Teri Britt Pipe, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Describe innovations that emerged as a strategy for fostering an environment conducive to using research in professional nursing practice. Methods: The Nursing Research Subcommittee (NRS) at Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona, has incorporated leadership strategies that support diffusion of innovation. The first step was implementation of a non-traditional brainstorming session. The goal of the brainstorming session was to generate multiple ideas for how to create the best environment for research in nursing practice. This process generated 117 ideas in 50 minutes. From that list, the committee prioritized the most promising strategies and decided upon two projects that would meet the goal of creating such an environment. Both strategies share the goal of empowering direct care nurses to evaluate, use, and promote research in professional practice. ?Nursing Research 101? is a series of continuing education opportunities whereby nurses learn about how nursing research supports a professional practice environment. Experts from the community as well as within the organization share expertise in a non-threatening approach. Nursing Research Champions are ?super-users? who encourage nursing research in their individual nursing departments and units and serve as liaisons to the committee. Recognition and professional challenge are strong motivators for continued participation and growth. Outcomes: The outcomes of these two innovative projects include a stronger and more widespread influence of research in diverse practice settings, guided by direct care nurses. Five ongoing educational sessions have been developed and offered with CEUs. To date, over 30 Nursing Research Champions have been identified. As a leadership strategy, the brainstorming process was instrumental in advancing leadership skills and opportunities for committee members and clinical nurses.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:51:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:51:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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