2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148809
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predicting Nursing Turnover With Catastrophe Theory
Abstract:
Predicting Nursing Turnover With Catastrophe Theory
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Wagner, Cheryl, RN, MSN/MBA
P.I. Institution Name:Kaplan University
Title:Assistant Dean of Nursing
Nurses are needed in hospital settings to provide safe patient care. Current projections of the nursing shortage indicate that nurses will be leaving nursing at a faster rate than they are entering (Buerhaus, Staiger & Auerbach, 2000), thereby jeopardizing safe patient care. The ability to predict turnover behavior and target effective retention measures to those staff nurses at risk for turnover behavior would allow for the alleviation of some of the nursing shortage effects. Therefore, it is imperative that a valid and reliable predictive turnover model be used in nursing. Previous work with nursing turnover has resulted in linear models with low predictive ability. Nonlinear models in turnover behavior have great potential for predictive application in nursing. Catastrophe theory (Thom, 1975; Zeeman, 1976) has been applied in a variety of discontinuous events in behavioral sciences, including organizational behaviors such as employee turnover (Sheridan & Abelson, 1983). Catastrophe models, particularly the cusp catastrophe model, create a conceptual framework upon which to base research into work-related issues that have a strong emotional component. Because turnover occurs in the context of affective responses and nonlinear behaviors, the cusp catastrophe model shows promise for greater predictability in nurse turnover explorations (Sheridan, 1980, 1985a; Sheridan & Abelson, 1983; Wagner & Huber, 2003).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredicting Nursing Turnover With Catastrophe Theoryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148809-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predicting Nursing Turnover With Catastrophe Theory</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wagner, Cheryl, RN, MSN/MBA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kaplan University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Dean of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">c.wagner@mchsi.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurses are needed in hospital settings to provide safe patient care. Current projections of the nursing shortage indicate that nurses will be leaving nursing at a faster rate than they are entering (Buerhaus, Staiger &amp; Auerbach, 2000), thereby jeopardizing safe patient care. The ability to predict turnover behavior and target effective retention measures to those staff nurses at risk for turnover behavior would allow for the alleviation of some of the nursing shortage effects. Therefore, it is imperative that a valid and reliable predictive turnover model be used in nursing. Previous work with nursing turnover has resulted in linear models with low predictive ability. Nonlinear models in turnover behavior have great potential for predictive application in nursing. Catastrophe theory (Thom, 1975; Zeeman, 1976) has been applied in a variety of discontinuous events in behavioral sciences, including organizational behaviors such as employee turnover (Sheridan &amp; Abelson, 1983). Catastrophe models, particularly the cusp catastrophe model, create a conceptual framework upon which to base research into work-related issues that have a strong emotional component. Because turnover occurs in the context of affective responses and nonlinear behaviors, the cusp catastrophe model shows promise for greater predictability in nurse turnover explorations (Sheridan, 1980, 1985a; Sheridan &amp; Abelson, 1983; Wagner &amp; Huber, 2003).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:51:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:51:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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