Physician Collaboration in the MGMC Domestic Violence Initiative

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148820
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physician Collaboration in the MGMC Domestic Violence Initiative
Abstract:
Physician Collaboration in the MGMC Domestic Violence Initiative
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Witkop, Catherine Takacs, MD
P.I. Institution Name:Malcolm Grow Medical Center
Title:Staff Physician/Resident Coordinator
Despite the recommendation of national organizations that health care providers screen for domestic violence, studies have demonstrated poor evidence of screening by all providers, including physicians. This deficiency has been seen in primary care and specialty clinics as well as in emergency department settings. Some of the barriers that prevent physicians from screening include: fear of offending the patient; lack of knowledge, training, time and resources; sense of inefficacy; loss of the patient-provider relationship; personal experience with partner abuse. Sugg and Innui (1992) reported that 61% of practicing primary care physicians in their study did not receive education about domestic violence, either during medical school, residency, or continuing education. Similarly, a study by Parsons et al (1995) found that 71% of obstetrician/gynecologists reported lack of training as a major barrier to screening. During the initial phase of our interdisciplinary peer-training model, we realized that physicians not only need this education, but also need to be involved in the training process. Therefore, attending physicians were included in peer training groups and now instruct other physicians. Physicians in our hospital attend an annual Grand Rounds on domestic violence awareness, screening, and intervention. Feedback has indicated that this is highly anticipated and well-received interactive presentation. In an attempt to reach physicians even before they begin independent clinical practice, the curriculum for the Obstetrics/Gynecology residents now includes an annual two-hour, interactive session. Physician response has been overwhelmingly positive. It is clear that most physicians are not adequately trained in domestic violence screening and intervention during their medical education. With our interdisciplinary program, we are attempting to overcome some of the identified barriers to providing comprehensive care for patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysician Collaboration in the MGMC Domestic Violence Initiativeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148820-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Physician Collaboration in the MGMC Domestic Violence Initiative</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Witkop, Catherine Takacs, MD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Malcolm Grow Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Staff Physician/Resident Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">katika@aya.yale.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Despite the recommendation of national organizations that health care providers screen for domestic violence, studies have demonstrated poor evidence of screening by all providers, including physicians. This deficiency has been seen in primary care and specialty clinics as well as in emergency department settings. Some of the barriers that prevent physicians from screening include: fear of offending the patient; lack of knowledge, training, time and resources; sense of inefficacy; loss of the patient-provider relationship; personal experience with partner abuse. Sugg and Innui (1992) reported that 61% of practicing primary care physicians in their study did not receive education about domestic violence, either during medical school, residency, or continuing education. Similarly, a study by Parsons et al (1995) found that 71% of obstetrician/gynecologists reported lack of training as a major barrier to screening. During the initial phase of our interdisciplinary peer-training model, we realized that physicians not only need this education, but also need to be involved in the training process. Therefore, attending physicians were included in peer training groups and now instruct other physicians. Physicians in our hospital attend an annual Grand Rounds on domestic violence awareness, screening, and intervention. Feedback has indicated that this is highly anticipated and well-received interactive presentation. In an attempt to reach physicians even before they begin independent clinical practice, the curriculum for the Obstetrics/Gynecology residents now includes an annual two-hour, interactive session. Physician response has been overwhelmingly positive. It is clear that most physicians are not adequately trained in domestic violence screening and intervention during their medical education. With our interdisciplinary program, we are attempting to overcome some of the identified barriers to providing comprehensive care for patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:51:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:51:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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