2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148824
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality Care at the End-of-Life
Abstract:
Quality Care at the End-of-Life
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Zhang, Weihua, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:1520 Clifton Road
Title:Post-doctoral fellow
Purpose: Patients and family members are still dissatisfied with end-of-life care. Expansion of hospice and palliative care, implementing Advance Directives, enhancing end-of-life decision-making through education programs have made some improvement for those who are cared for in the hospice setting. However, less than 16% of Medicare recipients received hospice care before death, and the average hospice stay before death is less than 34 days. Studies have attempted to explore patients and family members' perspectives on quality end of life, however, perspectives on ways that could ensure the quality of end-of-life care have not yet explored. The purpose of this study is to explore patients and family members' perspectives on quality end-of-life care and ways to improve care. Methods: A qualitative method will be used for this study. Interviews will be conducted with 10 dyads (patients and their caregivers) respectively. The interview question is what quality end-of-life care should be and how to ensure this quality care at the end of life. Constant comparative analysis developed by Glaser and Corbin will be used for the initial coding process. Themes on quality care at the end of life and ways to ensure the quality of end-of-life care will be extracted. Findings (study is still in progress): To date, 3 dyads have been interviewed. Preliminary findings suggested that symptom management, family support, financial issues, spiritual values, and personal values have been cited as important to the quality care at the end of life. An informational interactive Website to guide individuals to solve their most concerned problems may be one way to improve end-of-life care. Discussion: End-of-life care should be focused on solving each individual's most concerned problems and the support system should be comprehensive enough to accommodate patients and families' needs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality Care at the End-of-Lifeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148824-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Quality Care at the End-of-Life</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zhang, Weihua, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">1520 Clifton Road</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post-doctoral fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wzhang3@emory.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Patients and family members are still dissatisfied with end-of-life care. Expansion of hospice and palliative care, implementing Advance Directives, enhancing end-of-life decision-making through education programs have made some improvement for those who are cared for in the hospice setting. However, less than 16% of Medicare recipients received hospice care before death, and the average hospice stay before death is less than 34 days. Studies have attempted to explore patients and family members' perspectives on quality end of life, however, perspectives on ways that could ensure the quality of end-of-life care have not yet explored. The purpose of this study is to explore patients and family members' perspectives on quality end-of-life care and ways to improve care. Methods: A qualitative method will be used for this study. Interviews will be conducted with 10 dyads (patients and their caregivers) respectively. The interview question is what quality end-of-life care should be and how to ensure this quality care at the end of life. Constant comparative analysis developed by Glaser and Corbin will be used for the initial coding process. Themes on quality care at the end of life and ways to ensure the quality of end-of-life care will be extracted. Findings (study is still in progress): To date, 3 dyads have been interviewed. Preliminary findings suggested that symptom management, family support, financial issues, spiritual values, and personal values have been cited as important to the quality care at the end of life. An informational interactive Website to guide individuals to solve their most concerned problems may be one way to improve end-of-life care. Discussion: End-of-life care should be focused on solving each individual's most concerned problems and the support system should be comprehensive enough to accommodate patients and families' needs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:51:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:51:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.