Creating an Inclusive Environment for Vulnerable and Marginalized Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148838
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Creating an Inclusive Environment for Vulnerable and Marginalized Students
Abstract:
Creating an Inclusive Environment for Vulnerable and Marginalized Students
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Barry, Maureen A., RN, BScN, MScN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Toronto
Title:Senior Lecturer
Co-Authors:Betty Burcher,
[Clinical session research presentation] This presentation describes the formal and informal strategies undertaken to retain vulnerable and marginalized students in an accelerated or second-entry nursing program in a large Canadian university. Our students are diverse, reflecting the great cultural and social diversity of our large urban center. Our vulnerable students include a variety of learners. They may be mature students with young families, older students returning to school after a long absence, recent newcomers to Canada, ESL students or science majors without experience in writing essays. The students may also suffer from marginalization, particularly in clinical practicum, because of race or ethnic identity, sexuality, English language facility or learning challenge or dis/ability. While little is known overall about the success of second-entry programs since they are relatively new, we have a low attrition rate and a success rate of 98% in the registration exams, far surpassing the traditional nursing programs in our province. This presentation will also look at the research evidence to support inclusive strategies and environments for the retention of students. From the literature, we know that vulnerable students are less likely to succeed and that students who perceive that the faculty care about them, do better in their studies. Over the last few years, we have developed several strategies to support our students. These strategies include enhancing the quality of the student experience, early identification of students experiencing difficulty, instrumental support and referrals for finances, day-care and housing, counseling to deal with unrealistic expectations, and most recently the creation of an Ombudsperson, a confidential advocate who is not a faculty teacher. However, key to student retention success has been faculty and student peer mentorship.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCreating an Inclusive Environment for Vulnerable and Marginalized Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148838-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Creating an Inclusive Environment for Vulnerable and Marginalized Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Barry, Maureen A., RN, BScN, MScN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Toronto</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Senior Lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">maureen.barry@utoronto.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Betty Burcher,</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] This presentation describes the formal and informal strategies undertaken to retain vulnerable and marginalized students in an accelerated or second-entry nursing program in a large Canadian university. Our students are diverse, reflecting the great cultural and social diversity of our large urban center. Our vulnerable students include a variety of learners. They may be mature students with young families, older students returning to school after a long absence, recent newcomers to Canada, ESL students or science majors without experience in writing essays. The students may also suffer from marginalization, particularly in clinical practicum, because of race or ethnic identity, sexuality, English language facility or learning challenge or dis/ability. While little is known overall about the success of second-entry programs since they are relatively new, we have a low attrition rate and a success rate of 98% in the registration exams, far surpassing the traditional nursing programs in our province. This presentation will also look at the research evidence to support inclusive strategies and environments for the retention of students. From the literature, we know that vulnerable students are less likely to succeed and that students who perceive that the faculty care about them, do better in their studies. Over the last few years, we have developed several strategies to support our students. These strategies include enhancing the quality of the student experience, early identification of students experiencing difficulty, instrumental support and referrals for finances, day-care and housing, counseling to deal with unrealistic expectations, and most recently the creation of an Ombudsperson, a confidential advocate who is not a faculty teacher. However, key to student retention success has been faculty and student peer mentorship.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:51:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:51:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.