The Experience of American and Canadian Cancer Patients in Deciding to Seek Alternative Care in Mexican Cancer Clinics

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148851
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Experience of American and Canadian Cancer Patients in Deciding to Seek Alternative Care in Mexican Cancer Clinics
Abstract:
The Experience of American and Canadian Cancer Patients in Deciding to Seek Alternative Care in Mexican Cancer Clinics
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Bright, Alicia Laurel, MSN, CNS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Dominican University of California
Title:Adjunct Faculty, MSN Associate
[Clinical session research presentation] Background: Each year, despite warnings from the American Cancer Association, many US and Canadian citizens travel to Tijuana, Mexico, for cancer care. The main criticism of these clinics is that they provide treatments that are unproven, potentially unsafe, and expensive. Despite this, about 35 clinics exist in Tijuana that provide alternative care to patients who pay cash for these services. Objectives: To understand the lived experience of people who have made the choice to receive cancer treatment at alternative cancer clinics in Tijuana, and gain insight into the process by which that decision occurs. Population: 5 participants were interviewed. Three adult US citizens, one Canadian, and both parents of a US pediatric patient. Method: A phenomenological approach was used. Participants were interviewed at clinics while undergoing treatment. The researcher conducted a review of the clinics and treatments offered, along with history of the political, social, and economic climate in which the phenomena exists. Conclusions: Themes identified in the decision-making process are rational, social and emotional. People choose caregivers based on trusting relationships and reasons that seem rational to them. Decisions are often values based, such as quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Experience of American and Canadian Cancer Patients in Deciding to Seek Alternative Care in Mexican Cancer Clinicsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148851-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Experience of American and Canadian Cancer Patients in Deciding to Seek Alternative Care in Mexican Cancer Clinics</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bright, Alicia Laurel, MSN, CNS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Dominican University of California</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Adjunct Faculty, MSN Associate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ihpnurse@gmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] Background: Each year, despite warnings from the American Cancer Association, many US and Canadian citizens travel to Tijuana, Mexico, for cancer care. The main criticism of these clinics is that they provide treatments that are unproven, potentially unsafe, and expensive. Despite this, about 35 clinics exist in Tijuana that provide alternative care to patients who pay cash for these services. Objectives: To understand the lived experience of people who have made the choice to receive cancer treatment at alternative cancer clinics in Tijuana, and gain insight into the process by which that decision occurs. Population: 5 participants were interviewed. Three adult US citizens, one Canadian, and both parents of a US pediatric patient. Method: A phenomenological approach was used. Participants were interviewed at clinics while undergoing treatment. The researcher conducted a review of the clinics and treatments offered, along with history of the political, social, and economic climate in which the phenomena exists. Conclusions: Themes identified in the decision-making process are rational, social and emotional. People choose caregivers based on trusting relationships and reasons that seem rational to them. Decisions are often values based, such as quality of life.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:51:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:51:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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