Emotion-Focused Coping in the Initial Phase of Acute Myocardial Infarction

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148891
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emotion-Focused Coping in the Initial Phase of Acute Myocardial Infarction
Abstract:
Emotion-Focused Coping in the Initial Phase of Acute Myocardial Infarction
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Dayus, Deborah, RN, BA, BScN, MSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Windsor
Title:Lecturer
Co-Authors:Maher M. El-Masri, RN, PhD; Susan M. Fox-Wasylyshyn, RN, PhD
[Clinical session research presentation] Background: While several research studies focused on the impact of emotion-focused coping on delay in seeking care for myocardial infarction, little attention has been paid to the independent predictors of emotion-focused coping in this patient population.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the predictors of emotion-focused coping among patients with acute myocardial infarction. Methods: Secondary data analyses were performed using data from a sample of 135 patients who experienced AMI. Stepwise regression analysis was performed to examine the independent predictors of emotion-focused coping as measured by a 5-item scale that was developed for the purpose of this study.  Results: The data suggest that age (Beta = -208; p<.001), history of coronary bypass (Beta = -.184; p <.028), and country of residence (Beta = .173; p <.039) were the only the independent predictors. Interestingly, chest pain, history of previous myocardial infarction, and conclusion that the symptoms were related to the heart were not associated with emotion-focused coping. Conclusion: The use of negative emotion-focused coping can lead to delay in seeking care for acute myocardial infarction. Thus, understanding the factors that contribute to increased use of emotion-focused coping is important. The results highlight that patients with a previous history of coronary bypass and younger people are likely to engage in negative emotion-focused coping and thus need to be specifically targeted.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmotion-Focused Coping in the Initial Phase of Acute Myocardial Infarctionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148891-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Emotion-Focused Coping in the Initial Phase of Acute Myocardial Infarction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dayus, Deborah, RN, BA, BScN, MSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Windsor</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dayus@uwindsor.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Maher M. El-Masri, RN, PhD; Susan M. Fox-Wasylyshyn, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] Background: While several research studies focused on the impact of emotion-focused coping on delay in seeking care for myocardial infarction, little attention has been paid to the independent predictors of emotion-focused coping in this patient population.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the predictors of emotion-focused coping among patients with acute myocardial infarction. Methods: Secondary data analyses were performed using data from a sample of 135 patients who experienced AMI. Stepwise regression analysis was performed to examine the independent predictors of emotion-focused coping as measured by a 5-item scale that was developed for the purpose of this study.&nbsp; Results: The data suggest that age (Beta = -208; p&lt;.001), history of coronary bypass (Beta = -.184; p &lt;.028), and country of residence (Beta = .173; p &lt;.039) were the only the independent predictors. Interestingly, chest pain, history of previous myocardial infarction, and conclusion that the symptoms were related to the heart were not associated with emotion-focused coping. Conclusion: The use of negative emotion-focused coping can lead to delay in seeking care for acute myocardial infarction. Thus, understanding the factors that contribute to increased use of emotion-focused coping is important. The results highlight that patients with a previous history of coronary bypass and younger people are likely to engage in negative emotion-focused coping and thus need to be specifically targeted.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:52:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:52:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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