The Use of Rapid Assessment Techniques to Evaluate Noise on an In-Patient Unit

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148894
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Use of Rapid Assessment Techniques to Evaluate Noise on an In-Patient Unit
Abstract:
The Use of Rapid Assessment Techniques to Evaluate Noise on an In-Patient Unit
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Deitrick, Lynn, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network, Allentown, Pa
Title:Medical Anthropologist/Ethnographer
Co-Authors:Paulette Kennedy, RN, BSN, CNA, BC; Carol Cyriax, RN, BSN; Nancy Davies-Hathen, RN, MSN, CNAA, BC
[Clinical session research presentation] Introduction: Excess noise is a common problem in hospitals, and has been studied by researchers from around the world. Noise is defined as 'unwanted sound.' Studies indicate that the 'average' acceptable noise levels in an acute care setting range between 68-73 decibels. Common sources of noise in hospitals are from people, environment and machines. Our hospital ethnographer was asked by nursing leadership to do a rapid assessment of noise on one in-patient unit at our hospital due to complaints about noise from a physician and several patients on the unit. Methods: A rapid assessment was done on a busy, high traffic, high acuity med/surg telemetry unit over a 4 week period. Rapid assessment is an intensive, short term, team-based, multi-method process. The method consists of intensive, short term, triangulated data collection as well as an iterative process of data analysis. Results: Six main sources of environmental noise were identified. These include 1.conversational noise, 2. noise from doors that slam shut, 3. noise generated from the housekeeping closet/sink area and bed preparation team in the unit's back hallway, 4. noise from the pneumatic tube station in the unit's center hallway, 5. noise from shoes, particularly hard soled shoes clicking on the linoleum floors in the unit, and 6. miscellaneous noise from Wallaroos, call light consoles, equipment carts, and similar sources. Conclusions/Implications: Findings were reported to hospital administrators as well as to our facilities department so that work areas such as housekeeping closets, carts, door closers, and pneumatic tube stations can be modified to decrease audible noise in adjacent patient rooms. This study also demonstrates the value of rapid assessment methodology for the evaluation of clinical problems such as noise. Researchers at other institutions may want to use this method to evaluate noise in their institutions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Use of Rapid Assessment Techniques to Evaluate Noise on an In-Patient Uniten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148894-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Use of Rapid Assessment Techniques to Evaluate Noise on an In-Patient Unit</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Deitrick, Lynn, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network, Allentown, Pa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Medical Anthropologist/Ethnographer</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Lynn.Deitrick@lvh.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Paulette Kennedy, RN, BSN, CNA, BC; Carol Cyriax, RN, BSN; Nancy Davies-Hathen, RN, MSN, CNAA, BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] Introduction: Excess noise is a common problem in hospitals, and has been studied by researchers from around the world. Noise is defined as 'unwanted sound.' Studies indicate that the 'average' acceptable noise levels in an acute care setting range between 68-73 decibels. Common sources of noise in hospitals are from people, environment and machines. Our hospital ethnographer was asked by nursing leadership to do a rapid assessment of noise on one in-patient unit at our hospital due to complaints about noise from a physician and several patients on the unit. Methods: A rapid assessment was done on a busy, high traffic, high acuity med/surg telemetry unit over a 4 week period. Rapid assessment is an intensive, short term, team-based, multi-method process. The method consists of intensive, short term, triangulated data collection as well as an iterative process of data analysis.&nbsp;Results: Six main sources of environmental noise were identified. These include 1.conversational noise, 2. noise from doors that slam shut, 3. noise generated from the housekeeping closet/sink area and bed preparation team in the unit's back hallway, 4. noise from the pneumatic tube station in the unit's center hallway, 5. noise from shoes, particularly hard soled shoes clicking on the linoleum floors in the unit, and 6. miscellaneous noise from Wallaroos, call light consoles, equipment carts, and similar sources. Conclusions/Implications: Findings were reported to hospital administrators as well as to our facilities department so that work areas such as housekeeping closets, carts, door closers, and pneumatic tube stations can be modified to decrease audible noise in adjacent patient rooms. This study also demonstrates the value of rapid assessment methodology for the evaluation of clinical problems such as noise. Researchers at other institutions may want to use this method to evaluate noise in their institutions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:52:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:52:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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