2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148900
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relocated Older Adults Seeking Connections
Abstract:
Relocated Older Adults Seeking Connections
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Dupuis-Blanchard, Suzanne M., BSN, MN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Université de Moncton
Title:Assistant Professor
[Scientific session research presentation] Relocation, a common transition in older adults, can disrupt existing social networks and challenge seniors to reconstitute these networks. Social engagement is a required component of the process of reconstituting social networks and of feeling connected. These relationships have vital intrinsic values central to self-identity, self-confidence, and overall health and well-being. Although theories or models have, to some extent, taken into account the role of social relationships in well-being, none have explicitly discussed the importance of social engagement in older adults. The purpose of this focused ethnographic study was to develop an understanding of the experience of social engagement for new residents of a senior-designated apartment building in a Canadian urban area. The study was conducted in an apartment building that caters to independent adults over the age of 55 years. The findings were derived from data generated through time spent in the setting, participant-observation, retrieval of documents, interviews with older adults and other key informants, and a focus group discussion. This presentation will focus on one component of the findings which revealed that seniors who felt vulnerable created four types of connections to achieve their interaction goals: security, casual interaction, support and friendship. This finding provided a new understanding of the concept of social engagement in older adults previously lacking in the literature.Nurses must recognize and familiarize themselves with the transitions and processes of normal, healthy aging, including relocation in settings other than long-term care facilities. Future nursing research could explore social engagement with seniors living in a different senior-designated apartment building to examine for variation. Also, the limited number of people in the social network of study participants should be explored further.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelocated Older Adults Seeking Connectionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148900-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relocated Older Adults Seeking Connections</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dupuis-Blanchard, Suzanne M., BSN, MN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Universit&eacute; de Moncton</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">suzanne.dupuis-blanchard@umoncton.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Relocation, a common transition in older adults, can disrupt existing social networks and challenge seniors to reconstitute these networks. Social engagement is a required component of the process of reconstituting social networks and of feeling connected.&nbsp;These relationships have vital intrinsic values central to self-identity, self-confidence, and overall health and well-being. Although theories or models have, to some extent, taken into account the role of social relationships in well-being, none have explicitly discussed the importance of social engagement in older adults. The purpose of this focused ethnographic study was to develop an understanding of the experience of social engagement for new residents of a senior-designated apartment building in a Canadian urban area.&nbsp;The study was conducted in an apartment building that caters to independent adults over the age of 55 years. The findings were derived from data generated through time spent in the setting, participant-observation, retrieval of documents, interviews with older adults and other key informants, and a focus group discussion. This presentation will focus on one component of the findings which revealed that seniors who felt vulnerable created four types of connections to achieve their interaction goals: security, casual interaction, support and friendship. This finding provided a new understanding of the concept of social engagement in older adults previously lacking in the literature.Nurses must recognize and familiarize themselves with the transitions and processes of normal, healthy aging, including relocation in settings other than long-term care facilities.&nbsp;Future nursing research could explore social engagement with seniors living in a different senior-designated apartment building to examine for variation. Also, the limited number of people in the social network of study participants should be explored further.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:52:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:52:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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