Differences in Mexican-American and Non-Hispanic White Veterans' Homocysteine Levels

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148910
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Differences in Mexican-American and Non-Hispanic White Veterans' Homocysteine Levels
Abstract:
Differences in Mexican-American and Non-Hispanic White Veterans' Homocysteine Levels
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Baldwin, Carol M., PhD, RN, AHN-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Iris R. Bell, MD, PhD
Elevated homocysteine is reportedly an independent risk factor for stroke. This cross-sectional study assessed lifestyle factors of Mexican American (MA;n=109) and non-Hispanic white (NHW;n=120) male military veterans 54 to 85 years of age with varying degrees of cerebrovascular disease risk. Participants completed questionnaires on food frequency, health history, psychosocial function, and a stroke risk scale derived from the Framingham study. Subgroups of MA and NHW high (n=30) and low (n=30) on the stroke risk scale underwent blood tests for homocysteine, vitamin B12 and folate. Results from the biomarker study indicated that MA with high and low stroke risk scores and NHW with high stroke risk scores had significantly higher homocysteine than did the NHW veterans with low stroke risk, even after controlling for age, education, diabetes, and smoking pack years (p=0.009). Serum B12, serum folate, dietary and supplement intake of B vitamins did not differ between groups. Findings warrant further studies to clarify the relative contribution of veteran status, ethnicity, regional variations, genetic, and dietary/environmental factors in order to identify ethnically-relevant evidence-based predictors of, and culturally responsive nursing interventions for stroke in Mexican Americans.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDifferences in Mexican-American and Non-Hispanic White Veterans' Homocysteine Levelsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148910-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Differences in Mexican-American and Non-Hispanic White Veterans' Homocysteine Levels</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baldwin, Carol M., PhD, RN, AHN-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carol.baldwin@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Iris R. Bell, MD, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Elevated homocysteine is reportedly an independent risk factor for stroke. This cross-sectional study assessed lifestyle factors of Mexican American (MA;n=109) and non-Hispanic white (NHW;n=120) male military veterans 54 to 85 years of age with varying degrees of cerebrovascular disease risk. Participants completed questionnaires on food frequency, health history, psychosocial function, and a stroke risk scale derived from the Framingham study. Subgroups of MA and NHW high (n=30) and low (n=30) on the stroke risk scale underwent blood tests for homocysteine, vitamin B12 and folate. Results from the biomarker study indicated that MA with high and low stroke risk scores and NHW with high stroke risk scores had significantly higher homocysteine than did the NHW veterans with low stroke risk, even after controlling for age, education, diabetes, and smoking pack years (p=0.009). Serum B12, serum folate, dietary and supplement intake of B vitamins did not differ between groups. Findings warrant further studies to clarify the relative contribution of veteran status, ethnicity, regional variations, genetic, and dietary/environmental factors in order to identify ethnically-relevant evidence-based predictors of, and culturally responsive nursing interventions for stroke in Mexican Americans.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:52:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:52:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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