2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148911
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cuban Refugees' Perceptions of Available Community Support
Abstract:
Cuban Refugees' Perceptions of Available Community Support
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Barnes, Donelle M., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Texas Christian University
Title:Associate Professor
Purpose: Describe Cuban refugees' perceptions of; 1) Support needs during early resettlement; 2) Availability and effectiveness of support received from local and national sources, including Cuban, other Hispanic, and white communities, voluntary and government organizations; and 3) Unsupportive interactions. Background: Refugees must adapt to many life changes during flight and resettlement, producing acculturative stress associated with depression. Social support can buffer stress and has been correlated with reduced depression. The failure of current assistance programs to reduce depression may be due in part to a failure to address community-level (CL) support, conceptually defined as practical and affective resources available in the refugees' local and national environment. The development of CL support interventions has been hampered by lack of descriptive data and reliable measures for refugees. Cuban refugees are a representative refugee group because they are forced to flee political persecution and experience many life changes. Study Design: Participants included 30 Cuban-born adults, living in Texas, who arrived in the U.S. during the last five years and used Spanish as their first language. This cross-sectional, community-based study used semi-structured, in-depth interviews. Analysis included open and axial coding, making comparisons between cases, writing memos, and describing their perceptions of CL support. Importance of findings/recommendations: The primary source of practical support was the resettlement agency, followed by Cuban individuals. Emotional or spiritual support was most often received from other Cubans, followed by English-speaking individuals. Minimal support was received from other Spanish-speaking non-Cubans, such as Mexicans. Opinions were divided about when practical and emotional support was most important. Their overall perception of the U.S. government was positive. Participants were most at risk for stress and anxiety when the resettlement agency ended the official orientation period, leaving refugees with the perception that they were on their own.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCuban Refugees' Perceptions of Available Community Supporten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148911-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cuban Refugees' Perceptions of Available Community Support</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Barnes, Donelle M., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Texas Christian University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">d.barnes@tcu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Describe Cuban refugees' perceptions of; 1) Support needs during early resettlement; 2) Availability and effectiveness of support received from local and national sources, including Cuban, other Hispanic, and white communities, voluntary and government organizations; and 3) Unsupportive interactions. Background: Refugees must adapt to many life changes during flight and resettlement, producing acculturative stress associated with depression. Social support can buffer stress and has been correlated with reduced depression. The failure of current assistance programs to reduce depression may be due in part to a failure to address community-level (CL) support, conceptually defined as practical and affective resources available in the refugees' local and national environment. The development of CL support interventions has been hampered by lack of descriptive data and reliable measures for refugees. Cuban refugees are a representative refugee group because they are forced to flee political persecution and experience many life changes. Study Design: Participants included 30 Cuban-born adults, living in Texas, who arrived in the U.S. during the last five years and used Spanish as their first language. This cross-sectional, community-based study used semi-structured, in-depth interviews. Analysis included open and axial coding, making comparisons between cases, writing memos, and describing their perceptions of CL support. Importance of findings/recommendations: The primary source of practical support was the resettlement agency, followed by Cuban individuals. Emotional or spiritual support was most often received from other Cubans, followed by English-speaking individuals. Minimal support was received from other Spanish-speaking non-Cubans, such as Mexicans. Opinions were divided about when practical and emotional support was most important. Their overall perception of the U.S. government was positive. Participants were most at risk for stress and anxiety when the resettlement agency ended the official orientation period, leaving refugees with the perception that they were on their own.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:52:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:52:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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