2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148929
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Oral History of the First Ten Years of a School of Nursing
Abstract:
An Oral History of the First Ten Years of a School of Nursing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Curry, Donna Miles, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:College of Nursing & Health, Wright State University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Carol Holdcraft, RN, DNS
Purpose: This paper will examine the first ten years (1973-83) of the School of Nursing at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. Rationale and Significance: The 1970s were a decade implementing the energizing ideas that exploded during the 1960s. Feminism, transition to higher education and curriculum innovations were significant influences on professional nursing and at the same time producing controversy. Kalish (1982) referred to this controversy as the result of political socialization, evidenced by a pervasive sexist double standard. Method: Transcripts from oral interviews were analyzed using Donnelly's theoretical methodologies framework for examining cognitive models of events. Key informants representing a variety of viewpoints were invited to participate in semi-structured interviews and to share pictures or artifacts from the era. Interviewees included former undergraduate and graduate students, faculty from the school as well as other university faculty and administrators. Secondary sources include newspaper articles and other local publications as well as personal papers from some of the interviewees. Findings and Conclusions: Similar to Dayton' native sons, Orville and Wilber Wright, acceptance of innovation did not come easily but the long term effects can still be found today. Analysis of findings revealed not just a chronology of events during the first decade but significant values of excitement related to innovations in curriculum with concurrent controversy not only within the university but the community as well. Themes included control/power and male/female societal roles. A notable event was in 1980 when over 75% of the faculty and all of the administrators resigned in a controversy with university administrators over control of nursing education. Lessons learned from the controversy in 1980 include both positive influences on individuals, the nursing program and the community for those who left as well as for those who stayed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Oral History of the First Ten Years of a School of Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148929-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Oral History of the First Ten Years of a School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Curry, Donna Miles, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing &amp; Health, Wright State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">donna.curry@wright.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carol Holdcraft, RN, DNS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This paper will examine the first ten years (1973-83) of the School of Nursing at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. Rationale and Significance: The 1970s were a decade implementing the energizing ideas that exploded during the 1960s. Feminism, transition to higher education and curriculum innovations were significant influences on professional nursing and at the same time producing controversy. Kalish (1982) referred to this controversy as the result of political socialization, evidenced by a pervasive sexist double standard. Method: Transcripts from oral interviews were analyzed using Donnelly's theoretical methodologies framework for examining cognitive models of events. Key informants representing a variety of viewpoints were invited to participate in semi-structured interviews and to share pictures or artifacts from the era. Interviewees included former undergraduate and graduate students, faculty from the school as well as other university faculty and administrators. Secondary sources include newspaper articles and other local publications as well as personal papers from some of the interviewees. Findings and Conclusions: Similar to Dayton' native sons, Orville and Wilber Wright, acceptance of innovation did not come easily but the long term effects can still be found today. Analysis of findings revealed not just a chronology of events during the first decade but significant values of excitement related to innovations in curriculum with concurrent controversy not only within the university but the community as well. Themes included control/power and male/female societal roles. A notable event was in 1980 when over 75% of the faculty and all of the administrators resigned in a controversy with university administrators over control of nursing education. Lessons learned from the controversy in 1980 include both positive influences on individuals, the nursing program and the community for those who left as well as for those who stayed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:53:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:53:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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