2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148953
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of Life of School-Age Children
Abstract:
Quality of Life of School-Age Children
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Green, Angela L., MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
Title:Clinical Assistant Professor; Doctoral Student
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test a qualitative interview guide with healthy school aged children to 1) determine developmental appropriateness and feasibility and 2) describe their perceptions of their quality of life (QOL). The interview questions were based upon those used by Hinds et al. The appropriateness of questions has not been determined for children less than 8 years of age or with other illnesses other than cancer. Methods: Qualitative interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 6 healthy 6 to 11 year old children. Each child was asked to draw a picture of him/herself on a good day to initiate the interview. This was followed by semi-structured discussion using the interview guide as an outline. Interviews were audio recorded and interview transcripts were entered into Ethnograph. Data were analyzed using content analysis and constant comparison. Findings: Children as young as 6 years of age provided relevant, detailed answers to the questions. They described friends, play, school and family as the key factors impacting QOL with friends and play as the most important. School provided a setting for interaction with friends. However, ?getting good grades? and ?staying out of trouble? in school were also important. Family appeared to be secondary factor with the younger children describing the importance of being with parents and the older children describing negative interactions with siblings and being ?in trouble? with parents. Four of the 6 children described the negative impact of teasing, bullying and fighting on QOL. Discussion: The interview guide and techniques are appropriate for use healthy school aged children. Drawing is an effective means of developing rapport and easing children into a detailed discussion of their lives. The key factors identified by healthy children will provide a basis of comparison with those described by chronically ill children.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of Life of School-Age Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148953-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Quality of Life of School-Age Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Green, Angela L., MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Assistant Professor; Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">GreenAngelaL@uams.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test a qualitative interview guide with healthy school aged children to 1) determine developmental appropriateness and feasibility and 2) describe their perceptions of their quality of life (QOL). The interview questions were based upon those used by Hinds et al. The appropriateness of questions has not been determined for children less than 8 years of age or with other illnesses other than cancer. Methods: Qualitative interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 6 healthy 6 to 11 year old children. Each child was asked to draw a picture of him/herself on a good day to initiate the interview. This was followed by semi-structured discussion using the interview guide as an outline. Interviews were audio recorded and interview transcripts were entered into Ethnograph. Data were analyzed using content analysis and constant comparison. Findings: Children as young as 6 years of age provided relevant, detailed answers to the questions. They described friends, play, school and family as the key factors impacting QOL with friends and play as the most important. School provided a setting for interaction with friends. However, ?getting good grades? and ?staying out of trouble? in school were also important. Family appeared to be secondary factor with the younger children describing the importance of being with parents and the older children describing negative interactions with siblings and being ?in trouble? with parents. Four of the 6 children described the negative impact of teasing, bullying and fighting on QOL. Discussion: The interview guide and techniques are appropriate for use healthy school aged children. Drawing is an effective means of developing rapport and easing children into a detailed discussion of their lives. The key factors identified by healthy children will provide a basis of comparison with those described by chronically ill children.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:53:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:53:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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