Older Gay and Bisexual Men, Their Partners, and HIV Risk Behaviors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148954
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Older Gay and Bisexual Men, Their Partners, and HIV Risk Behaviors
Abstract:
Older Gay and Bisexual Men, Their Partners, and HIV Risk Behaviors
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Gullette, Donna L., DSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arkansas Medical Sciences
Title:Associate Professor
Purpose. This descriptive correlational online survey of gay and bisexual men determined the relationships among stages of change, self-efficacy, and practices of condom usage with primary and casual partners. The effectiveness of using the Internet to collect data was also evaluated. Methods. A convenience sample of 241 gay and bisexual men was recruited via the Internet to complete an online survey. Instruments used were the Transtheoretical Model to Condom (TMC) Use and self-efficacy questionnaires. Participants were instructed how to access questionnaires, and submit them online. Confidentiality was assured by utilizing an electronic system to eliminate the respondent's email address. Findings. Mean age was 34.5 for these self-identified gay (n = 194; 80.5%) or bisexual (n =47, 19.5%) men. Over half of the men reported never using a condom during oral intercourse with a primary or casual partner. The majority of these men with primary partners were in the first stage of change (precontemplation) for using a condom during anal intercourse. Less than 1/3 of these men reported using a condom every time (maintenance stage) during anal intercourse with a casual partner. Predictor variables associated with higher stages of change included being older, having a higher income, informing partners of HIV status, reporting more advantages in using condoms, and having fewer sexual partners. Bisexual men were more likely to use a condom with a primary partner. Discussion. The results supported the usefulness of the TCM for classifying men's stages of change and types of sexual behavior. There was a marked difference between safer sex practices of younger and older men with different types of partners. Conclusions. These findings support the need for new educational interventions other than condom usage for younger and older gay and bisexual men. The Internet modality worked well for collecting this type of sensitive data.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOlder Gay and Bisexual Men, Their Partners, and HIV Risk Behaviorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148954-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Older Gay and Bisexual Men, Their Partners, and HIV Risk Behaviors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gullette, Donna L., DSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arkansas Medical Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dgullette@uams.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose. This descriptive correlational online survey of gay and bisexual men determined the relationships among stages of change, self-efficacy, and practices of condom usage with primary and casual partners. The effectiveness of using the Internet to collect data was also evaluated. Methods. A convenience sample of 241 gay and bisexual men was recruited via the Internet to complete an online survey. Instruments used were the Transtheoretical Model to Condom (TMC) Use and self-efficacy questionnaires. Participants were instructed how to access questionnaires, and submit them online. Confidentiality was assured by utilizing an electronic system to eliminate the respondent's email address. Findings. Mean age was 34.5 for these self-identified gay (n = 194; 80.5%) or bisexual (n =47, 19.5%) men. Over half of the men reported never using a condom during oral intercourse with a primary or casual partner. The majority of these men with primary partners were in the first stage of change (precontemplation) for using a condom during anal intercourse. Less than 1/3 of these men reported using a condom every time (maintenance stage) during anal intercourse with a casual partner. Predictor variables associated with higher stages of change included being older, having a higher income, informing partners of HIV status, reporting more advantages in using condoms, and having fewer sexual partners. Bisexual men were more likely to use a condom with a primary partner. Discussion. The results supported the usefulness of the TCM for classifying men's stages of change and types of sexual behavior. There was a marked difference between safer sex practices of younger and older men with different types of partners. Conclusions. These findings support the need for new educational interventions other than condom usage for younger and older gay and bisexual men. The Internet modality worked well for collecting this type of sensitive data.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:53:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:53:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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