Blackboard? as an Adjunct Teaching Strategy in a Clinical Pediatric Nursing Course

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148958
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Blackboard? as an Adjunct Teaching Strategy in a Clinical Pediatric Nursing Course
Abstract:
Blackboard? as an Adjunct Teaching Strategy in a Clinical Pediatric Nursing Course
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Heinzer, Marjorie, PhD, MSN, RN, CS, CRNP
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Associate Professor
Clinical nursing courses for baccalaureate level curricula present challenges to faculty. Increased volume of highly technical and holistic knowledge must be conveyed in a relatively short time. Even with a 15 week semester, students have less than 40 hours of in-class content as quizzes, examinations, and discussions are included within the planned class times. Pediatric nursing courses are difficult for many students as growth and development issues and critical medication calculations are introduced to students. The problems become more serious when fast track programs condense a semester-long course to a five week intensive course. Students have less time to process knowledge for application in clinical settings. Larger classes of nursing students minimize the numbers of students who can actively participate in a classroom discussion. Similar challenges that are less obvious include the ?strong? student who tends to dominate the classroom discussions and hesitancy of some students to spontaneously respond in class. Quiet students are less likely to contribute in the larger groups. Thus, the traditional classroom format is no longer sufficient or efficient for teaching critical nursing content. The innovative use of Blackboard? technology for online case studies, problem-solving exercises, outlines, resource sharing, and application of knowledge proved invaluable to pediatric nursing students in one university program. Each week a discussion forum was added to address current content and allow students to share their clinical experiences. Links for nursing and health care information databases were available and accessible through Blackboard?. In addition, all course materials were online for students throughout the semester. The faculty had greater opportunities to assess student learning and answer questions while students had time to think carefully before posting comments and search out information prior to asking questions. Merging distance learning with face to face learning strategies enhanced student participation and demonstrated positive outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBlackboard? as an Adjunct Teaching Strategy in a Clinical Pediatric Nursing Courseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148958-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Blackboard? as an Adjunct Teaching Strategy in a Clinical Pediatric Nursing Course</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Heinzer, Marjorie, PhD, MSN, RN, CS, CRNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">marjorie.heinzer@case.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical nursing courses for baccalaureate level curricula present challenges to faculty. Increased volume of highly technical and holistic knowledge must be conveyed in a relatively short time. Even with a 15 week semester, students have less than 40 hours of in-class content as quizzes, examinations, and discussions are included within the planned class times. Pediatric nursing courses are difficult for many students as growth and development issues and critical medication calculations are introduced to students. The problems become more serious when fast track programs condense a semester-long course to a five week intensive course. Students have less time to process knowledge for application in clinical settings. Larger classes of nursing students minimize the numbers of students who can actively participate in a classroom discussion. Similar challenges that are less obvious include the ?strong? student who tends to dominate the classroom discussions and hesitancy of some students to spontaneously respond in class. Quiet students are less likely to contribute in the larger groups. Thus, the traditional classroom format is no longer sufficient or efficient for teaching critical nursing content. The innovative use of Blackboard? technology for online case studies, problem-solving exercises, outlines, resource sharing, and application of knowledge proved invaluable to pediatric nursing students in one university program. Each week a discussion forum was added to address current content and allow students to share their clinical experiences. Links for nursing and health care information databases were available and accessible through Blackboard?. In addition, all course materials were online for students throughout the semester. The faculty had greater opportunities to assess student learning and answer questions while students had time to think carefully before posting comments and search out information prior to asking questions. Merging distance learning with face to face learning strategies enhanced student participation and demonstrated positive outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:53:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:53:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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