2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148960
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Nature of Professional Resilience
Abstract:
The Nature of Professional Resilience
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Hodges, Helen F., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Mercer University
Title:Professional Resilience, Career Longevity, and Parse?s Theory for Baccalaureate Education
Co-Authors:Ann C. Keeley, RN, MN, APRN, BC; Patricia J. Troyan, RN, CNM, EdD
New nurses seem unable to find a means of flourishing professionally in acute care practice, and consequently exit far earlier than expected. Historically nurses' career paths were notable for their longevity, but a career path today often means 5 years or less. As many as 60% of new graduate RNs leave their first job within the first year. Hospitals have been especially difficult to populate with nurses committed to building career longevity and expertise in highly complex and unpredictable acute care. The literature typically describes why nurses leave nursing, burnout characteristics, and the nursing shortage, but little appears in the literature about the process by which nurses create and adapt their own careers within settings that are demanding, ambiguous, and rife with interdisciplinary challenges. The purpose of this research was to explore the experiences of nurses who have chosen to stay in acute care nursing. Using a qualitative phenomenological design, the investigators sought to uncover common factors, practices, beliefs, and adaptations of acute care nurses that are perceived to promote professional resilience. Findings are presented thematically with implications for further research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Nature of Professional Resilienceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148960-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Nature of Professional Resilience</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hodges, Helen F., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mercer University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professional Resilience, Career Longevity, and Parse?s Theory for Baccalaureate Education</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hodges_hf@mercer.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ann C. Keeley, RN, MN, APRN, BC; Patricia J. Troyan, RN, CNM, EdD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">New nurses seem unable to find a means of flourishing professionally in acute care practice, and consequently exit far earlier than expected. Historically nurses' career paths were notable for their longevity, but a career path today often means 5 years or less. As many as 60% of new graduate RNs leave their first job within the first year. Hospitals have been especially difficult to populate with nurses committed to building career longevity and expertise in highly complex and unpredictable acute care. The literature typically describes why nurses leave nursing, burnout characteristics, and the nursing shortage, but little appears in the literature about the process by which nurses create and adapt their own careers within settings that are demanding, ambiguous, and rife with interdisciplinary challenges. The purpose of this research was to explore the experiences of nurses who have chosen to stay in acute care nursing. Using a qualitative phenomenological design, the investigators sought to uncover common factors, practices, beliefs, and adaptations of acute care nurses that are perceived to promote professional resilience. Findings are presented thematically with implications for further research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:53:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:53:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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