Policies and Practices That Influence Recruitment and Retention of Men in Nursing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148987
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Policies and Practices That Influence Recruitment and Retention of Men in Nursing
Abstract:
Policies and Practices That Influence Recruitment and Retention of Men in Nursing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:LaRocco, Susan A., PhD, RN, MBA
P.I. Institution Name:Curry College
Title:Associate Professor
Approximately 129,000 male Registered Nurses (RNs) are employed in nursing, accounting for 5.9% of all RNs employed in nursing. By 2020, the national projected shortage of RNs in the workforce is 291,000. One way to increase the number of nurses is to increase the number of men in nursing. The purpose of this study was to explore the process that led to the male nurse's decision to become a nurse, the advantages and disadvantages of nursing as a career for the men, and to identify policies and practices that facilitate the entry of men into nursing and the retention of male nurses in the workforce. The study was guided by the Conceptual Model of Nursing and Health Policy (Fawcett & Russell, 2001). Data were collected during 2003 by individual, semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 20 male nurses, residing in Massachusetts, with 1 to 35 years of experience as RNs. Recruitment themes that emerged from the data included educating the public about the positive aspects of nursing as a career and exposing children to men who are nurses. Retention themes were adequate salaries and benefits, a good practice environment, and personal recognition. The men indicated that retention of nurses was not gender specific. Implications for policy and practice include strategies for increasing public awareness of nursing as a career choice for men, educating the public about benefits of nursing as a career, promoting a male friendly environment in educational settings, and providing male nurses with opportunities to share their enthusiasm for nursing with adolescents who are making career choices. Professional organizations, health care institutions, nursing schools, and individual nurses have opportunities to influence some or all of the policies and practices that affect recruitment and retention of men in nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePolicies and Practices That Influence Recruitment and Retention of Men in Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148987-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Policies and Practices That Influence Recruitment and Retention of Men in Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">LaRocco, Susan A., PhD, RN, MBA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Curry College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">slarocco0603@curry.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Approximately 129,000 male Registered Nurses (RNs) are employed in nursing, accounting for 5.9% of all RNs employed in nursing. By 2020, the national projected shortage of RNs in the workforce is 291,000. One way to increase the number of nurses is to increase the number of men in nursing. The purpose of this study was to explore the process that led to the male nurse's decision to become a nurse, the advantages and disadvantages of nursing as a career for the men, and to identify policies and practices that facilitate the entry of men into nursing and the retention of male nurses in the workforce. The study was guided by the Conceptual Model of Nursing and Health Policy (Fawcett &amp; Russell, 2001). Data were collected during 2003 by individual, semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 20 male nurses, residing in Massachusetts, with 1 to 35 years of experience as RNs. Recruitment themes that emerged from the data included educating the public about the positive aspects of nursing as a career and exposing children to men who are nurses. Retention themes were adequate salaries and benefits, a good practice environment, and personal recognition. The men indicated that retention of nurses was not gender specific. Implications for policy and practice include strategies for increasing public awareness of nursing as a career choice for men, educating the public about benefits of nursing as a career, promoting a male friendly environment in educational settings, and providing male nurses with opportunities to share their enthusiasm for nursing with adolescents who are making career choices. Professional organizations, health care institutions, nursing schools, and individual nurses have opportunities to influence some or all of the policies and practices that affect recruitment and retention of men in nursing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:54:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:54:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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