Moral Sensitivity and Reasoning About Ethical Issues Related to Genetic Concerns of Clients and Their Families

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149021
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Moral Sensitivity and Reasoning About Ethical Issues Related to Genetic Concerns of Clients and Their Families
Abstract:
Moral Sensitivity and Reasoning About Ethical Issues Related to Genetic Concerns of Clients and Their Families
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Overvold-Ronningen, Mary, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Luther College
Title:Associate Professor
This study investigated the effects of a brief educational intervention on measures of moral reasoning and sensitivity about ethical issues related to genetic concerns of individuals and their families. Relationships between moral reasoning and sensitivity and other variables of interest were also explored. A convenience sample of 73 undergraduate students enrolled in a health care ethics course at a small midwestern college were randomly assigned to a treatment (n = 38) and a control group (n = 35). Instruments used included the Defining Issues Test developed by J. Rest and a demographic questionnaire and case study questionnaire. The brief intervention included the provision of fact sheets about four common genetic conditions featured in the case study questionnaire. Statistical analysis with an independent t-test revealed no significant differences on measures of moral reasoning and sensitivity between groups. However, using nonparametric and parametric tests of associations, prior coursework in genetics was found to be positively associated with moral reasoning and sensitivity, and a positive relationship was found between moral reasoning ability and moral sensitivity. Of the seventeen participant characteristics that were examined, only two, major area of study and gender were found to be positively associated with the level of moral reasoning on the case study questionnaire. Multiple regression analysis revealed that prior formal coursework in genetics and DIT-P scores were positively associated with scores on the multiple-choice questionnaire for all cases combined, and no other variables reached significance with these two in the model. Multiple regression analysis also revealed that three variables (health care major, age, and major in Biology) were positively related to moral sensitivity (the number of correctly identified ethical issues embedded in the case studies across all four cases combined).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMoral Sensitivity and Reasoning About Ethical Issues Related to Genetic Concerns of Clients and Their Familiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149021-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Moral Sensitivity and Reasoning About Ethical Issues Related to Genetic Concerns of Clients and Their Families</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Overvold-Ronningen, Mary, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Luther College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">overvoma@luther.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study investigated the effects of a brief educational intervention on measures of moral reasoning and sensitivity about ethical issues related to genetic concerns of individuals and their families. Relationships between moral reasoning and sensitivity and other variables of interest were also explored. A convenience sample of 73 undergraduate students enrolled in a health care ethics course at a small midwestern college were randomly assigned to a treatment (n = 38) and a control group (n = 35). Instruments used included the Defining Issues Test developed by J. Rest and a demographic questionnaire and case study questionnaire. The brief intervention included the provision of fact sheets about four common genetic conditions featured in the case study questionnaire. Statistical analysis with an independent t-test revealed no significant differences on measures of moral reasoning and sensitivity between groups. However, using nonparametric and parametric tests of associations, prior coursework in genetics was found to be positively associated with moral reasoning and sensitivity, and a positive relationship was found between moral reasoning ability and moral sensitivity. Of the seventeen participant characteristics that were examined, only two, major area of study and gender were found to be positively associated with the level of moral reasoning on the case study questionnaire. Multiple regression analysis revealed that prior formal coursework in genetics and DIT-P scores were positively associated with scores on the multiple-choice questionnaire for all cases combined, and no other variables reached significance with these two in the model. Multiple regression analysis also revealed that three variables (health care major, age, and major in Biology) were positively related to moral sensitivity (the number of correctly identified ethical issues embedded in the case studies across all four cases combined).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:54:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:54:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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