2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149025
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Instilling Faith and Value-Based Care in Nursing Students
Abstract:
Instilling Faith and Value-Based Care in Nursing Students
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Pozza, Renee, RN, MSN, CNS, CFNP
P.I. Institution Name:Southern California Liver Centers and Azusa Pacific University
Title:Hepatology Nurse Practitioner and Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Anna Hefner, RN, MSN, MaEd, CPNP
Background: Spirituality has been defined as a personal quest for understanding answers to ultimate questions about life, about meaning, and about relationships to the sacred or transcended, which may (or may not) lead to or arise from the development of religious rituals and the formation of community (Koening, 2001). It is an expression of our faith in God and the center of who we are. As nurses, we each bring our own personal ?frame of reference? which effects our practice and the spiritual care we provide. In nursing, a professional life incorporates services to others. Spiritual care is caring one human being to another human being who needs help and/or care. It is known that a patient's religious beliefs may help or hinder in coping with illness and that those beliefs will influence healthcare decisions. Methods: The study was conducted with undergraduate nursing students in a traditional baccalaureate program. The study is a self-assessment of the nursing student's personal values and beliefs as it relates to spiritual care. Theological and value based concepts were introduced by professors in courses across the nursing curriculum at all levels. Data collected examined the faith tradition in which the student was raised as well as the practiced faith tradition. Students were given the opportunity to record their spiritual journey in clinical settings. Evaluation was provided from the insights of the participants. Conclusion: Nursing students value the opportunity to reflect on personal spiritual and religious issues. Students were willing to talk, share, explore insights and concerns. Through self-discovery, many identified personal biases and identified personal limits. Implications: Nurses need the opportunity to clarify one's own values and religious beliefs and the opportunity to explore other values and religious beliefs outside their own. This in turn will assist nurse's in providing spiritual care for their patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInstilling Faith and Value-Based Care in Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149025-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Instilling Faith and Value-Based Care in Nursing Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pozza, Renee, RN, MSN, CNS, CFNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southern California Liver Centers and Azusa Pacific University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Hepatology Nurse Practitioner and Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">RPozza@apu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Anna Hefner, RN, MSN, MaEd, CPNP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Spirituality has been defined as a personal quest for understanding answers to ultimate questions about life, about meaning, and about relationships to the sacred or transcended, which may (or may not) lead to or arise from the development of religious rituals and the formation of community (Koening, 2001). It is an expression of our faith in God and the center of who we are. As nurses, we each bring our own personal ?frame of reference? which effects our practice and the spiritual care we provide. In nursing, a professional life incorporates services to others. Spiritual care is caring one human being to another human being who needs help and/or care. It is known that a patient's religious beliefs may help or hinder in coping with illness and that those beliefs will influence healthcare decisions. Methods: The study was conducted with undergraduate nursing students in a traditional baccalaureate program. The study is a self-assessment of the nursing student's personal values and beliefs as it relates to spiritual care. Theological and value based concepts were introduced by professors in courses across the nursing curriculum at all levels. Data collected examined the faith tradition in which the student was raised as well as the practiced faith tradition. Students were given the opportunity to record their spiritual journey in clinical settings. Evaluation was provided from the insights of the participants. Conclusion: Nursing students value the opportunity to reflect on personal spiritual and religious issues. Students were willing to talk, share, explore insights and concerns. Through self-discovery, many identified personal biases and identified personal limits. Implications: Nurses need the opportunity to clarify one's own values and religious beliefs and the opportunity to explore other values and religious beliefs outside their own. This in turn will assist nurse's in providing spiritual care for their patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:54:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:54:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.