Attitudes About End-of-Life Care Among Nurses and Physicians in Adult Inpatient Acute Care Settings at an Academic Medical Center

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149032
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Attitudes About End-of-Life Care Among Nurses and Physicians in Adult Inpatient Acute Care Settings at an Academic Medical Center
Abstract:
Attitudes About End-of-Life Care Among Nurses and Physicians in Adult Inpatient Acute Care Settings at an Academic Medical Center
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Rolland, Roberta, BS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:SUNY Upstate Medical University Hospital
Co-Authors:Melanie Kalman, PhD, RN
Introduction: Hospice has been shown to be associated with increased satisfaction with end-of-life care, however many terminally ill patients do not receive hospice care. Physicians serve as gatekeepers to hospice and greatly influence end-of-life care. Nurses play a major role in the direct care of patients at the end of life. Bradley explored the need to improve the quality of care for dying patients. This study will replicate Bradley's research and examine attitudes about end-of-life care using three constructs: efficacy of hospice, patient-clinician communication about end-of-life issues, and professional responsibility. Research Question: What are the attitudes about end-of-life care among nurses and physicians at an academic medical center? Design: This is a descriptive study using surveys developed by Bradley to assess attitudes about end-of-life care among nurses and physicians. Surveys were distributed to 311 physicians and 345 registered nurses in adult inpatient acute care settings at an academic medical center. Data Analysis: Data collection is currently underway. Data analysis will include standard frequency, parametric, and non-parametric testing. Nursing Implications: Nurses spend more time with patients who are facing the end of life than any other member of the health care team. Knowledge and the ability to communicate about end-of-life issues affect the quality of care for the dying patient. The first step is to assess these constructs, and with this information, interventions can be designed. The findings of this study may support educational programs focused on end-of-life issues.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAttitudes About End-of-Life Care Among Nurses and Physicians in Adult Inpatient Acute Care Settings at an Academic Medical Centeren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149032-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Attitudes About End-of-Life Care Among Nurses and Physicians in Adult Inpatient Acute Care Settings at an Academic Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rolland, Roberta, BS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">SUNY Upstate Medical University Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rollandr@upstate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Melanie Kalman, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: Hospice has been shown to be associated with increased satisfaction with end-of-life care, however many terminally ill patients do not receive hospice care. Physicians serve as gatekeepers to hospice and greatly influence end-of-life care. Nurses play a major role in the direct care of patients at the end of life. Bradley explored the need to improve the quality of care for dying patients. This study will replicate Bradley's research and examine attitudes about end-of-life care using three constructs: efficacy of hospice, patient-clinician communication about end-of-life issues, and professional responsibility. Research Question: What are the attitudes about end-of-life care among nurses and physicians at an academic medical center? Design: This is a descriptive study using surveys developed by Bradley to assess attitudes about end-of-life care among nurses and physicians. Surveys were distributed to 311 physicians and 345 registered nurses in adult inpatient acute care settings at an academic medical center. Data Analysis: Data collection is currently underway. Data analysis will include standard frequency, parametric, and non-parametric testing. Nursing Implications: Nurses spend more time with patients who are facing the end of life than any other member of the health care team. Knowledge and the ability to communicate about end-of-life issues affect the quality of care for the dying patient. The first step is to assess these constructs, and with this information, interventions can be designed. The findings of this study may support educational programs focused on end-of-life issues.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:54:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:54:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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