Family Presence during Resuscitation and Invasive Procedures: Evolution of a Nursing Intervention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149044
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family Presence during Resuscitation and Invasive Procedures: Evolution of a Nursing Intervention
Abstract:
Family Presence during Resuscitation and Invasive Procedures: Evolution of a Nursing Intervention
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Lamont, Scott Chisholm, BSN, RN, CCRN, CFRN, ENC(C)
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, San Francisco
Title:Doctoral Student
Purpose: The specific aims of this qualitative study were to 1) analyze the practice of facilitating family presence during resuscitation; 2) determine appropriate nursing classification labels and definitions that accurately reflect this emerging clinical practice related to serious or life-threatening health events; 3) suggest implementation strategies for this intervention based on the current state of the science. Background and significance: Modern hospitals have commonly excluded family members during invasive procedures or resuscitation. Although this practice continues, it is being challenged both in the literature and in the clinical setting. Methods: A comprehensive literature review was undertaken, and the literature was the primary source of data. A concept analysis was performed using Morse’s qualitative method. Specific attributes of the impetus for family presence, the intervention itself, and of the outcome desired were identified. Results: It is clear from the current literature that many families desire to be present when a family member is undergoing resuscitation. This desire is a manifestation of normal family functioning and role expression. There is evidence that family presence is desirable and beneficial for both patient and family. Some staff may feel threatened by family presence. The need to provide resources which may be scarce, such as personnel to actively support the family members, may be problematic. Conclusions: Implementing a protocol and training program will take both time and resources. Additionally, a method for tracking outcomes and identifying problems must be developed. Facilities that adopt family presence must have a commitment to work through problems using an interdisciplinary approach. This practice warrants further research, particularly the interdisciplinary aspects.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily Presence during Resuscitation and Invasive Procedures: Evolution of a Nursing Interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149044-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family Presence during Resuscitation and Invasive Procedures: Evolution of a Nursing Intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lamont, Scott Chisholm, BSN, RN, CCRN, CFRN, ENC(C)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">slamont@itsa.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The specific aims of this qualitative study were to 1) analyze the practice of facilitating family presence during resuscitation; 2) determine appropriate nursing classification labels and definitions that accurately reflect this emerging clinical practice related to serious or life-threatening health events; 3) suggest implementation strategies for this intervention based on the current state of the science. Background and significance: Modern hospitals have commonly excluded family members during invasive procedures or resuscitation. Although this practice continues, it is being challenged both in the literature and in the clinical setting. Methods: A comprehensive literature review was undertaken, and the literature was the primary source of data. A concept analysis was performed using Morse&rsquo;s qualitative method. Specific attributes of the impetus for family presence, the intervention itself, and of the outcome desired were identified. Results: It is clear from the current literature that many families desire to be present when a family member is undergoing resuscitation. This desire is a manifestation of normal family functioning and role expression. There is evidence that family presence is desirable and beneficial for both patient and family. Some staff may feel threatened by family presence. The need to provide resources which may be scarce, such as personnel to actively support the family members, may be problematic. Conclusions: Implementing a protocol and training program will take both time and resources. Additionally, a method for tracking outcomes and identifying problems must be developed. Facilities that adopt family presence must have a commitment to work through problems using an interdisciplinary approach. This practice warrants further research, particularly the interdisciplinary aspects.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:55:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:55:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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