Getting People to Do What They Want: Empowering Nontenure Faculty to Develop Their Niche

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149053
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Getting People to Do What They Want: Empowering Nontenure Faculty to Develop Their Niche
Abstract:
Getting People to Do What They Want: Empowering Nontenure Faculty to Develop Their Niche
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Lindsey, Pamela L., MS, RN, APN
P.I. Institution Name:Illinois State University
Title:Undergraduate Program Director
In this time of dramatic nursing faculty shortage, it is imperative that leaders in nursing education strive to efficiently manage all resources, including personnel. Within a university setting, the position of a nontenure track faculty member is tenuous due to the fact that it is a nonpermanent position, yet the expertise of these persons is critical in providing quality nursing education. Additionally, these faculty members are often long- term employees and contribute a significant workload effort to the program. Mennonite College of Nursing was previously a private upper division nursing college that merged into Illinois State University, a public university with faculty tenure and non-tenure track designations. The nontenure track faculty suddenly faced an environment in which the stability of their jobs changed. Interesting phenomena occurred during the program transition from private to public sector. While non-tenure track faculty could have perished in such a move, a number of these faculty members creatively carved out areas of specialty, established themselves as experts, developed a niche, and thereby made them invaluable to the College of Nursing. This was achieved through support and empowerment from new administrative leadership. The purpose of this paper is to identify the strategies in which administrative leadership empowered nontenure track faculty to identify and establish areas of expertise. These strategies may be used by others in academic leadership roles to foster recognition and reward for nontenure faculty.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGetting People to Do What They Want: Empowering Nontenure Faculty to Develop Their Nicheen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149053-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Getting People to Do What They Want: Empowering Nontenure Faculty to Develop Their Niche</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lindsey, Pamela L., MS, RN, APN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Illinois State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Undergraduate Program Director</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pllinds@ilstu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In this time of dramatic nursing faculty shortage, it is imperative that leaders in nursing education strive to efficiently manage all resources, including personnel. Within a university setting, the position of a nontenure track faculty member is tenuous due to the fact that it is a nonpermanent position, yet the expertise of these persons is critical in providing quality nursing education. Additionally, these faculty members are often long- term employees and contribute a significant workload effort to the program. Mennonite College of Nursing was previously a private upper division nursing college that merged into Illinois State University, a public university with faculty tenure and non-tenure track designations. The nontenure track faculty suddenly faced an environment in which the stability of their jobs changed. Interesting phenomena occurred during the program transition from private to public sector. While non-tenure track faculty could have perished in such a move, a number of these faculty members creatively carved out areas of specialty, established themselves as experts, developed a niche, and thereby made them invaluable to the College of Nursing. This was achieved through support and empowerment from new administrative leadership. The purpose of this paper is to identify the strategies in which administrative leadership empowered nontenure track faculty to identify and establish areas of expertise. These strategies may be used by others in academic leadership roles to foster recognition and reward for nontenure faculty.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:55:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:55:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.