"Who Am I Becoming?": Self-Concept and the Phases of Engulfment in Individuals with First-Episode Schizophrenia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149059
Type:
Presentation
Title:
"Who Am I Becoming?": Self-Concept and the Phases of Engulfment in Individuals with First-Episode Schizophrenia
Abstract:
"Who Am I Becoming?": Self-Concept and the Phases of Engulfment in Individuals with First-Episode Schizophrenia
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Lysiak-Globe, Tanya J., RN, MSc
P.I. Institution Name:St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, Centre for Mountain Health Services
Title:Research Assistant
Co-Authors:Elizabeth McCay, RN, PhD
OBJECTIVE The primary objective was to use engulfment theory to describe the changes to self-concept that may occur as individuals with first episode schizophrenia (FES)incorporate the illness experience into their identity. Specifically, aspects of self-concept were assessed for differences across the three developmental phases of engulfment. Secondary objectives were to explore relationships among engulfment, self-concept and demographic characteristics, and to provide preliminary normative data for use of the Modified Engulfment Scale in a first episode population. DESIGN A cross-sectional design was employed. POPULATION, SAMPLE, SETTING The sample consisted of 45 young adults hospitalized for a first episode of schizophrenia at an urban mental health facility. CONCEPT OR VARIABLES STUDIED TOGETHER Engulfment was measured using the Modified Engulfment Scale (MES). Self-concept was assessed by the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale: 2nd Edition (TSCS:2). METHODS This was a secondary analysis of data obtained through self-report measures of self-concept and engulfment. FINDINGS Key findings suggest that particular aspects of self-concept were significantly different between the early and late phases of engulfment. In addition, education and social activity were negatively and significantly correlated with engulfment (r=-.27, p=0.05). Volunteer activity was positively and significantly correlated with overall self-concept (r=.32, p=0.02). CONCLUSIONS Young adults recovering from a first episode of schizophrenia are vulnerable to negative changes in self-concept as they incorporate mental illness into their identity. Findings suggest that particular aspects of self-concept may be most vulnerable during the illness experience and that education, social activity and volunteering may act as protective factors in the engulfment process. Preliminary normative data was obtained for use of the MES in a FES population. IMPLICATIONS Nurses are in a key position to form partnerships and develop strategies that support healthy aspects of self-concept and prevent engulfment. These findings can help to inform clinical practice, future research and mental health care policy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.title"Who Am I Becoming?": Self-Concept and the Phases of Engulfment in Individuals with First-Episode Schizophreniaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149059-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">&quot;Who Am I Becoming?&quot;: Self-Concept and the Phases of Engulfment in Individuals with First-Episode Schizophrenia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lysiak-Globe, Tanya J., RN, MSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, Centre for Mountain Health Services</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tlysiak@stjosham.on.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elizabeth McCay, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">OBJECTIVE The primary objective was to use engulfment theory to describe the changes to self-concept that may occur as individuals with first episode schizophrenia (FES)incorporate the illness experience into their identity. Specifically, aspects of self-concept were assessed for differences across the three developmental phases of engulfment. Secondary objectives were to explore relationships among engulfment, self-concept and demographic characteristics, and to provide preliminary normative data for use of the Modified Engulfment Scale in a first episode population. DESIGN A cross-sectional design was employed. POPULATION, SAMPLE, SETTING The sample consisted of 45 young adults hospitalized for a first episode of schizophrenia at an urban mental health facility. CONCEPT OR VARIABLES STUDIED TOGETHER Engulfment was measured using the Modified Engulfment Scale (MES). Self-concept was assessed by the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale: 2nd Edition (TSCS:2). METHODS This was a secondary analysis of data obtained through self-report measures of self-concept and engulfment. FINDINGS Key findings suggest that particular aspects of self-concept were significantly different between the early and late phases of engulfment. In addition, education and social activity were negatively and significantly correlated with engulfment (r=-.27, p=0.05). Volunteer activity was positively and significantly correlated with overall self-concept (r=.32, p=0.02). CONCLUSIONS Young adults recovering from a first episode of schizophrenia are vulnerable to negative changes in self-concept as they incorporate mental illness into their identity. Findings suggest that particular aspects of self-concept may be most vulnerable during the illness experience and that education, social activity and volunteering may act as protective factors in the engulfment process. Preliminary normative data was obtained for use of the MES in a FES population. IMPLICATIONS Nurses are in a key position to form partnerships and develop strategies that support healthy aspects of self-concept and prevent engulfment. These findings can help to inform clinical practice, future research and mental health care policy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:55:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:55:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.