2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149063
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development of the Short Term Assessment of Risk (STAR)
Abstract:
Development of the Short Term Assessment of Risk (STAR)
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Martin, Mary- Lou, RN, MScN
P.I. Institution Name:St. Joseph's Healthcare
Title:Clinical Nurse Specialist
Co-Authors:Connie Middleton, RN, CPMHN(c); Christopher Webster, PhD; Joelle Mamuza, PhD; Reeta Varma, N/A
Objective: The main aim of this pilot study is to determine if the Short Term Assessment of Risk (STAR) items individually or collectively associate with violent incidents on the forensic in-patient unit or in the community. Design: The design is a retrospective follow-up back study. Population, Sample, Setting: The is a file study and involves no direct contact with patients. Casebooks of 60 forensic patients will be reviewed using the STAR. Concept or Variable Studied Together: The researchers have developed a tool called the Short Term Assessment of Risk (STAR) which consists of 22 dynamic risk factors. Methods: A file based review of 60 forensic patients' casebooks will be reviewed and assessed using the STAR. Half of the cases will be from the in-patient unit and half of the patients will have had community followup for 6 months following discharge. A separate pair of raters will code the actual outcome (incidence of violence). The separation of prediction variables from the outcome variables will permit the statistical computation of the relationships between the two variables. Item by item and inter-rater reliability will be evaluated. Conclusions: The findings will be available in April 2003. Implications: This study attempts to narrow the gap between clinical practice and research. Recommendation for further testing of a revised instrument will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment of the Short Term Assessment of Risk (STAR)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149063-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development of the Short Term Assessment of Risk (STAR)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Martin, Mary- Lou, RN, MScN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. Joseph's Healthcare</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Martin@stjosham.on.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Connie Middleton, RN, CPMHN(c); Christopher Webster, PhD; Joelle Mamuza, PhD; Reeta Varma, N/A</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The main aim of this pilot study is to determine if the Short Term Assessment of Risk (STAR) items individually or collectively associate with violent incidents on the forensic in-patient unit or in the community. Design: The design is a retrospective follow-up back study. Population, Sample, Setting: The is a file study and involves no direct contact with patients. Casebooks of 60 forensic patients will be reviewed using the STAR. Concept or Variable Studied Together: The researchers have developed a tool called the Short Term Assessment of Risk (STAR) which consists of 22 dynamic risk factors. Methods: A file based review of 60 forensic patients' casebooks will be reviewed and assessed using the STAR. Half of the cases will be from the in-patient unit and half of the patients will have had community followup for 6 months following discharge. A separate pair of raters will code the actual outcome (incidence of violence). The separation of prediction variables from the outcome variables will permit the statistical computation of the relationships between the two variables. Item by item and inter-rater reliability will be evaluated. Conclusions: The findings will be available in April 2003. Implications: This study attempts to narrow the gap between clinical practice and research. Recommendation for further testing of a revised instrument will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:55:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:55:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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