The Faculty Shortage Challenge: Strategies for Maintaining Quality Educational Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149077
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Faculty Shortage Challenge: Strategies for Maintaining Quality Educational Outcomes
Abstract:
The Faculty Shortage Challenge: Strategies for Maintaining Quality Educational Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Moffett, Barbara S., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Southeastern Louisiana University
Title:Professor of Nursing
Numerous factors have been implicated in the current nursing faculty shortage, including aging and retirement of faculty, salaries that are non-competitive with clinical and private-sector settings, and fewer numbers of individuals entering graduate education programs. Proposed solutions to the faculty shortage have focused on joint or adjunct part-time faculty appointments, utilizing greater numbers of masters prepared faculty, implementing fast-track graduate degree programs, and supporting legislative funding for graduate education. While these proposals may provide short-term relief, most introduce new concerns about long-term effects on nursing education and the nursing profession. Clinical partnerships often provide opportunities for recruitment of adjunct and part-time faculty. While clinical agency personnel are often clinically proficient, development of teaching skills and orientation to clinical standards and evaluation tools is essential for achievement of educational objectives and quality experiences for students. A number of strategies can be used to facilitate this objective. Data suggest that high percentages of part-time and adjunct faculty can adversely affect program outcomes. Selection processes can also affect long-term success. Masters prepared faculty comprise a large percentage of nursing faculty positions throughout the country. Providing clinical teaching tracks as an alternative to academic tenure tracks provides a means for advancement and promotion for these individuals, however, a balance must be maintained to support the mission of the academic institution and to assure a research agenda that will contribute to the profession’s body of knowledge. Recruiting faculty without supplying them with the tools to be successful is counterproductive. Development is essential for retention of both full-time and part-time faculty. Committed leadership is required to create an educational environment that employs innovative strategies for securing and retaining faculty without abandoning the core values and curricular integrity of the program.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Faculty Shortage Challenge: Strategies for Maintaining Quality Educational Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149077-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Faculty Shortage Challenge: Strategies for Maintaining Quality Educational Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moffett, Barbara S., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southeastern Louisiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bmoffett@selu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Numerous factors have been implicated in the current nursing faculty shortage, including aging and retirement of faculty, salaries that are non-competitive with clinical and private-sector settings, and fewer numbers of individuals entering graduate education programs. Proposed solutions to the faculty shortage have focused on joint or adjunct part-time faculty appointments, utilizing greater numbers of masters prepared faculty, implementing fast-track graduate degree programs, and supporting legislative funding for graduate education. While these proposals may provide short-term relief, most introduce new concerns about long-term effects on nursing education and the nursing profession. Clinical partnerships often provide opportunities for recruitment of adjunct and part-time faculty. While clinical agency personnel are often clinically proficient, development of teaching skills and orientation to clinical standards and evaluation tools is essential for achievement of educational objectives and quality experiences for students. A number of strategies can be used to facilitate this objective. Data suggest that high percentages of part-time and adjunct faculty can adversely affect program outcomes. Selection processes can also affect long-term success. Masters prepared faculty comprise a large percentage of nursing faculty positions throughout the country. Providing clinical teaching tracks as an alternative to academic tenure tracks provides a means for advancement and promotion for these individuals, however, a balance must be maintained to support the mission of the academic institution and to assure a research agenda that will contribute to the profession&rsquo;s body of knowledge. Recruiting faculty without supplying them with the tools to be successful is counterproductive. Development is essential for retention of both full-time and part-time faculty. Committed leadership is required to create an educational environment that employs innovative strategies for securing and retaining faculty without abandoning the core values and curricular integrity of the program.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:55:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:55:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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