Relationship of EBP, Student Perspectives of "Evidence", and Student Judgment Development

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149080
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship of EBP, Student Perspectives of "Evidence", and Student Judgment Development
Abstract:
Relationship of EBP, Student Perspectives of "Evidence", and Student Judgment Development
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Navedo, Deborah, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Boston College School of Education
Title:Ph.D.-c
Background and Research Question: Critical thinking instruments that measure skills and dispositions do not appear to capture cognitive changes that occur during the senior year of nursing school. Yet, nursing faculty are very aware that a significant cognitive synthesis of content knowledge and clinical practice takes place. This development has been studied in the form of expert practice (Benner, 1994), yet its manifestation and assessment in the senior nursing student remains elusive. This study employs grounded theory methodology to revisit student nursing judgment development as evidenced in student discussions of nursing care, and to explore its relationship with current cognitive development and judgment development theories. Related Literature: Recent reviews of the available CT assessment instruments indicate that these may not be capturing the synthesis and development that occur during the senior year (Adams, 1999; Gordon, 2000; May et al, 1999). Concurrently, research on judgment development in college students has yielded alternative perspectives of student judgment development (King & Kitchener, 1994; Perry, 1981) Specifically, how the student perceives knowledge and the evidence supporting it are described. Methods: Data were gathered from Non-RN senior nursing students through audio taping during clinical conference and classroom discussions. About 46 students participated resulting in approximately 40 hours of discussions that were transcribed. Each student's comments were individually identified and clustered for analysis. Open coding results were compared with results from a coding scheme developed from various judgment development theories. Results: Preliminary results will be presented. Implications: An alternative definition for nursing student judgment development will be offered. This in turn will guide further research that may lead to the improved teaching and assessment of nursing judgment. In addition, findings will guide further research in how nurses perceive knowledge and how evidence based practice (EBP) is applied in nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship of EBP, Student Perspectives of "Evidence", and Student Judgment Developmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149080-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship of EBP, Student Perspectives of &quot;Evidence&quot;, and Student Judgment Development</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Navedo, Deborah, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Boston College School of Education</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Ph.D.-c</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">navedod@bc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background and Research Question: Critical thinking instruments that measure skills and dispositions do not appear to capture cognitive changes that occur during the senior year of nursing school. Yet, nursing faculty are very aware that a significant cognitive synthesis of content knowledge and clinical practice takes place. This development has been studied in the form of expert practice (Benner, 1994), yet its manifestation and assessment in the senior nursing student remains elusive. This study employs grounded theory methodology to revisit student nursing judgment development as evidenced in student discussions of nursing care, and to explore its relationship with current cognitive development and judgment development theories. Related Literature: Recent reviews of the available CT assessment instruments indicate that these may not be capturing the synthesis and development that occur during the senior year (Adams, 1999; Gordon, 2000; May et al, 1999). Concurrently, research on judgment development in college students has yielded alternative perspectives of student judgment development (King &amp; Kitchener, 1994; Perry, 1981) Specifically, how the student perceives knowledge and the evidence supporting it are described. Methods: Data were gathered from Non-RN senior nursing students through audio taping during clinical conference and classroom discussions. About 46 students participated resulting in approximately 40 hours of discussions that were transcribed. Each student's comments were individually identified and clustered for analysis. Open coding results were compared with results from a coding scheme developed from various judgment development theories. Results: Preliminary results will be presented. Implications: An alternative definition for nursing student judgment development will be offered. This in turn will guide further research that may lead to the improved teaching and assessment of nursing judgment. In addition, findings will guide further research in how nurses perceive knowledge and how evidence based practice (EBP) is applied in nursing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:55:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:55:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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