Traditional Versus Evidence-Based Practice: Reducing Catheter-Related Blood-Stream Infections

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149082
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Traditional Versus Evidence-Based Practice: Reducing Catheter-Related Blood-Stream Infections
Abstract:
Traditional Versus Evidence-Based Practice: Reducing Catheter-Related Blood-Stream Infections
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Nelson, Susanne Lori, BScN
P.I. Institution Name:University Health Network
Title:Nurse Coordinator-Vascular Access
Traditional Versus Evidence-Based Practice: Reducing Catheter-Related Blood-Stream Infections Blood-stream infection is the leading and most serious complication associated with vascular access. The majority of bloodstream infections begin with colonization of the vascular-access catheter insertion tract by bacteria from the patients’ own skin flora. The use of an appropriate skin antiseptic at the time of the catheter insertion and for subsequent catheter care is regarded as one of the most important measures in the prevention of vascular access related infection. It is essential that staff nurses, nurse educators, and advanced practice nurses work in collaboration with other disciplines (e.g., infection control, medicine, epidemiology) to advocate for evidenced based practice in their clinical areas. At present, in Ontario, a number of skin preparation solutions including 70% isopropyl alcohol, 0.5% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) and 10% povidone-iodine are being used. The purpose of this poster is to present the findings of a literature review conducted using multiple databases. The findings indicate that CHG is more effective in reducing catheter-related bloodstream infections than both povidone-iodine and isopropyl alcohol. The poster will also include multidisciplinary recommendations for practice changes and future research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTraditional Versus Evidence-Based Practice: Reducing Catheter-Related Blood-Stream Infectionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149082-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Traditional Versus Evidence-Based Practice: Reducing Catheter-Related Blood-Stream Infections</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nelson, Susanne Lori, BScN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University Health Network</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Coordinator-Vascular Access</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">susanne.nelson@uhn.on.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Traditional Versus Evidence-Based Practice: Reducing Catheter-Related Blood-Stream Infections Blood-stream infection is the leading and most serious complication associated with vascular access. The majority of bloodstream infections begin with colonization of the vascular-access catheter insertion tract by bacteria from the patients&rsquo; own skin flora. The use of an appropriate skin antiseptic at the time of the catheter insertion and for subsequent catheter care is regarded as one of the most important measures in the prevention of vascular access related infection. It is essential that staff nurses, nurse educators, and advanced practice nurses work in collaboration with other disciplines (e.g., infection control, medicine, epidemiology) to advocate for evidenced based practice in their clinical areas. At present, in Ontario, a number of skin preparation solutions including 70% isopropyl alcohol, 0.5% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) and 10% povidone-iodine are being used. The purpose of this poster is to present the findings of a literature review conducted using multiple databases. The findings indicate that CHG is more effective in reducing catheter-related bloodstream infections than both povidone-iodine and isopropyl alcohol. The poster will also include multidisciplinary recommendations for practice changes and future research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:55:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:55:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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