2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149083
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Care Choices
Abstract:
Health Care Choices
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Nichols, Elizabeth G., RN, DNS, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Dakota
Title:Dean and Professor
Co-Authors:Jean Shreffler, RN, PhD; Clarann Weinert, SC, PhD, RN, FAAN; Bette A. Ide, RN, PhD
Objective: to explore the use, cost, and satisfaction of rural-dwelling older adults with quality and effectiveness of complementary therapies. Design: a cross-sectional descriptive survey was conducted using telephone interviews. Sample, setting: 325 individuals between 60 & 98 years of age, 160 from Montana and 165 from North Dakota. Methods: a nested, multi-state random sample was generated using two strata per state and five towns per strata. Names were randomly drawn from commercially purchased telephone listings. The University of North Dakota Social Science Research Institute conducted scripted telephone interviews. Variables: Data were collected on use of, cost of, and satisfaction with complementary therapy as well as selected demographic characteristics, self-assessment of health, religiosity, and use of traditional health care services. Findings: Only 17.5% of the participants reported using complementary providers, while 35.7% used self-directed practices (e.g. herbs). 202 participants reported having one or more chronic health conditions, although 78% claimed to be in good or better health. Participants most often learned about the therapies from relatives or friends. Logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with use of complementary therapy. Of the factors examined, education had the strongest association with complementary therapy use (providers and self-directed). The more years of education, the higher were the odds of use of complementary care. Conclusions: These rural dwellers tended to use self-directed practices more than treatment by a therapist. The use of either therapy or self-directed practices was lower than has been found in national samples. Implications: Older individuals have a greater prevalence of chronic illness, use more health care services than do younger individuals. As older people live longer with chronic illnesses that require ongoing management of both the disease processes and the attendant symptoms, and as health care systems increasingly promote in-home self-management, the choices individuals make about treatments are important.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Care Choicesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149083-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Care Choices</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nichols, Elizabeth G., RN, DNS, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Dakota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean and Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Elizabeth.Nichols@mail.und.nodak.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jean Shreffler, RN, PhD; Clarann Weinert, SC, PhD, RN, FAAN; Bette A. Ide, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: to explore the use, cost, and satisfaction of rural-dwelling older adults with quality and effectiveness of complementary therapies. Design: a cross-sectional descriptive survey was conducted using telephone interviews. Sample, setting: 325 individuals between 60 &amp; 98 years of age, 160 from Montana and 165 from North Dakota. Methods: a nested, multi-state random sample was generated using two strata per state and five towns per strata. Names were randomly drawn from commercially purchased telephone listings. The University of North Dakota Social Science Research Institute conducted scripted telephone interviews. Variables: Data were collected on use of, cost of, and satisfaction with complementary therapy as well as selected demographic characteristics, self-assessment of health, religiosity, and use of traditional health care services. Findings: Only 17.5% of the participants reported using complementary providers, while 35.7% used self-directed practices (e.g. herbs). 202 participants reported having one or more chronic health conditions, although 78% claimed to be in good or better health. Participants most often learned about the therapies from relatives or friends. Logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with use of complementary therapy. Of the factors examined, education had the strongest association with complementary therapy use (providers and self-directed). The more years of education, the higher were the odds of use of complementary care. Conclusions: These rural dwellers tended to use self-directed practices more than treatment by a therapist. The use of either therapy or self-directed practices was lower than has been found in national samples. Implications: Older individuals have a greater prevalence of chronic illness, use more health care services than do younger individuals. As older people live longer with chronic illnesses that require ongoing management of both the disease processes and the attendant symptoms, and as health care systems increasingly promote in-home self-management, the choices individuals make about treatments are important.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:55:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:55:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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