End-of-Life In Intensive Care: A Survey of Primary Care Nurses Caring For Patients on Comfort Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149105
Type:
Presentation
Title:
End-of-Life In Intensive Care: A Survey of Primary Care Nurses Caring For Patients on Comfort Care
Abstract:
End-of-Life In Intensive Care: A Survey of Primary Care Nurses Caring For Patients on Comfort Care
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Segelke, Terry C., RN, MSN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Kaiser Permanente
Title:End-of-Life In Intensive Care:A Survey of Primary Care Nurses Caring For Patients on Comfort Care
Co-Authors:Myrna Lucas-Fleming, RN, MSN, CCRN; Avelina D. Estepa, RN, MSN, PHN; Nazir Jamal Habib, MD
Purpose: This performance improvement study was conducted to assess Critical Care nurses’ perceived competence and their experience in caring for terminal ICU patients on comfort care. Background/ Significance: Despite the consensus for palliation, there remains the dominant concern that ICU nurses under treat discomfort and do not improve pain levels of patients before death. Methods: A concurrent survey was given primary care RNs caring for patients not expected to survive hospitalization and withdrawn from life-sustaining measures with a focus on palliation. Questions on a Likert scale elicited responses on (a) participation in planning for comfort care, (b) comfort administering medication doses for palliation, and (c) family satisfaction with patient comfort. Results: There were 94 survey responses from the nursing staff of this 19-bed adult medical-surgical ICU of an HMO community hospital. Nurse reported their patients as very comfortable (43%), comfortable (50%) and uncomfortable to very uncomfortable (7%). Nurses’ views of family satisfaction with the level of comfort achieved were very adequate to adequate (94%) and inadequate to very inadequate (4%). When asked about their level of comfort administering medication doses for palliation, only 8% of the nurses reported being very uncomfortable to uncomfortable. When asked about their satisfaction with level of participation in planning for comfort goals for their patients, 85% reported very adequate to adequate satisfaction. Conclusions: Nurses in our study reported that they were skilled in providing comfort measures and were involved in planning for comfort care. Further study is needed to evaluate effectiveness of symptom management through the patient’s response.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnd-of-Life In Intensive Care: A Survey of Primary Care Nurses Caring For Patients on Comfort Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149105-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">End-of-Life In Intensive Care: A Survey of Primary Care Nurses Caring For Patients on Comfort Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Segelke, Terry C., RN, MSN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kaiser Permanente</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">End-of-Life In Intensive Care:A Survey of Primary Care Nurses Caring For Patients on Comfort Care</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tsegelke@aol.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Myrna Lucas-Fleming, RN, MSN, CCRN; Avelina D. Estepa, RN, MSN, PHN; Nazir Jamal Habib, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This performance improvement study was conducted to assess Critical Care nurses&rsquo; perceived competence and their experience in caring for terminal ICU patients on comfort care. Background/ Significance: Despite the consensus for palliation, there remains the dominant concern that ICU nurses under treat discomfort and do not improve pain levels of patients before death. Methods: A concurrent survey was given primary care RNs caring for patients not expected to survive hospitalization and withdrawn from life-sustaining measures with a focus on palliation. Questions on a Likert scale elicited responses on (a) participation in planning for comfort care, (b) comfort administering medication doses for palliation, and (c) family satisfaction with patient comfort. Results: There were 94 survey responses from the nursing staff of this 19-bed adult medical-surgical ICU of an HMO community hospital. Nurse reported their patients as very comfortable (43%), comfortable (50%) and uncomfortable to very uncomfortable (7%). Nurses&rsquo; views of family satisfaction with the level of comfort achieved were very adequate to adequate (94%) and inadequate to very inadequate (4%). When asked about their level of comfort administering medication doses for palliation, only 8% of the nurses reported being very uncomfortable to uncomfortable. When asked about their satisfaction with level of participation in planning for comfort goals for their patients, 85% reported very adequate to adequate satisfaction. Conclusions: Nurses in our study reported that they were skilled in providing comfort measures and were involved in planning for comfort care. Further study is needed to evaluate effectiveness of symptom management through the patient&rsquo;s response.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:56:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:56:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.