2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149117
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Role Performance of Staff Nurses in Government Hospitals
Abstract:
Role Performance of Staff Nurses in Government Hospitals
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Somgiat, Bencharat, RN, MS
P.I. Institution Name:Police Hospital
Co-Authors:Areewan Oumtanee, RN, PhD
The purposes of this descriptive research were to examine the relationships of personal factors, organizational support, head nurse-staff-nurse exchange, and nurses’ role performance; and to predict role performance of staff nurses working in hospitals located in Bangkok, Thailand. Applying the leader-member exchange concept of Liden and Maslyn, organizational support concept of Eisenberger et al. to examine the relationships to role performance developed by the Thai Bureau of Nursing. Study subjects were 356 staff nurses randomly selected from government hospitals in Bangkok. The major findings were as follows: (1) educational level was not associated with role performance; (2) age, marital status, length of work, head nurse-staff nurse exchange, and organizational support were significantly related to role performance; and three predictors of role performance were head nurse-staff nurse exchange, being single, and length of work, which were accounted for 14.4% of variance. Study findings indicated that building good relationships between head and staff nurses based on both personal (affection and loyalty) and professional (contribution and professional respect) relationships can motivate staff nurses to effectively perform nursing practice roles. In addition, organizational support should be maintained due to improve effective nurses’ performance as well.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRole Performance of Staff Nurses in Government Hospitalsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149117-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Role Performance of Staff Nurses in Government Hospitals</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Somgiat, Bencharat, RN, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Police Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">b_somgiat@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Areewan Oumtanee, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purposes of this descriptive research were to examine the relationships of personal factors, organizational support, head nurse-staff-nurse exchange, and nurses&rsquo; role performance; and to predict role performance of staff nurses working in hospitals located in Bangkok, Thailand. Applying the leader-member exchange concept of Liden and Maslyn, organizational support concept of Eisenberger et al. to examine the relationships to role performance developed by the Thai Bureau of Nursing. Study subjects were 356 staff nurses randomly selected from government hospitals in Bangkok. The major findings were as follows: (1) educational level was not associated with role performance; (2) age, marital status, length of work, head nurse-staff nurse exchange, and organizational support were significantly related to role performance; and three predictors of role performance were head nurse-staff nurse exchange, being single, and length of work, which were accounted for 14.4% of variance. Study findings indicated that building good relationships between head and staff nurses based on both personal (affection and loyalty) and professional (contribution and professional respect) relationships can motivate staff nurses to effectively perform nursing practice roles. In addition, organizational support should be maintained due to improve effective nurses&rsquo; performance as well.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:56:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:56:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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