The Effects of Master’s Education on Clinical Nurse Specialist and Nurse Practitioner Role Choices, Role Flexibility, and Practice Settings

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149122
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Master’s Education on Clinical Nurse Specialist and Nurse Practitioner Role Choices, Role Flexibility, and Practice Settings
Abstract:
The Effects of Master’s Education on Clinical Nurse Specialist and Nurse Practitioner Role Choices, Role Flexibility, and Practice Settings
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Stark, Sharon Wallace, DNSc, RN, CS, APN-C
P.I. Institution Name:Monmouth University
Introduction: As practice boundaries become more diversified, CNSs and NPs are afforded opportunities to evolve and expand APN roles, activities and practice settings. Conceptual Framework Role theory delineates role activities that are practiced by all, some, or none in similar roles and is determined by the amount and frequency that activities are perform by others in those roles (Biddle & Thomas, 1979). Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive, comparative study was to identify differences in role choices, role flexibility, and practice settings among master's prepared CNSs and NPs educated in specialized, and combined programs. A stratified, random sample of CNSs and NPs in the U.S. were selected. Two hundred eighty-five subjects were included in the study. Methodology: A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) measured differences among groups in relation to role choices, role flexibility, and practice settings. ANOVAs compared group differences in APN role choices, role activities, and practice settings. Findings: Significant differences were found between CNS and NP groups, and CNS and combined groups. The combined (M = 172) group was more flexible in performing APN role activities than the CNS (M = 170), and NP (M = 161) groups. Implications: The findings of this study add empirical support for a combined CNS and NP education for broader role choices, role flexibility and practice settings. As traditional role and practice boundaries continue to overlap practice options and practice settings will expand (Grosel, Hamilton, Koyano & Eastwood, 1997; NACNEP, 1999). In order for APNs to be part of the changing environment of health care it is important be able to perform multiple APN activities, and practice in a variety of settings.Combined CNS and NP education advances nursing education that fosters greater exploration of expanded roles for the APN, evidenced-based practice, nursing research, and measures outcomes of APN practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Master’s Education on Clinical Nurse Specialist and Nurse Practitioner Role Choices, Role Flexibility, and Practice Settingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149122-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Master&rsquo;s Education on Clinical Nurse Specialist and Nurse Practitioner Role Choices, Role Flexibility, and Practice Settings</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stark, Sharon Wallace, DNSc, RN, CS, APN-C</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Monmouth University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hscdk@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: As practice boundaries become more diversified, CNSs and NPs are afforded opportunities to evolve and expand APN roles, activities and practice settings. Conceptual Framework Role theory delineates role activities that are practiced by all, some, or none in similar roles and is determined by the amount and frequency that activities are perform by others in those roles (Biddle &amp; Thomas, 1979). Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive, comparative study was to identify differences in role choices, role flexibility, and practice settings among master's prepared CNSs and NPs educated in specialized, and combined programs. A stratified, random sample of CNSs and NPs in the U.S. were selected. Two hundred eighty-five subjects were included in the study. Methodology: A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) measured differences among groups in relation to role choices, role flexibility, and practice settings. ANOVAs compared group differences in APN role choices, role activities, and practice settings. Findings: Significant differences were found between CNS and NP groups, and CNS and combined groups. The combined (M = 172) group was more flexible in performing APN role activities than the CNS (M = 170), and NP (M = 161) groups. Implications: The findings of this study add empirical support for a combined CNS and NP education for broader role choices, role flexibility and practice settings. As traditional role and practice boundaries continue to overlap practice options and practice settings will expand (Grosel, Hamilton, Koyano &amp; Eastwood, 1997; NACNEP, 1999). In order for APNs to be part of the changing environment of health care it is important be able to perform multiple APN activities, and practice in a variety of settings.Combined CNS and NP education advances nursing education that fosters greater exploration of expanded roles for the APN, evidenced-based practice, nursing research, and measures outcomes of APN practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:56:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:56:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.