Errors in Clinical Practice: Current Thoughts on Incidence, Reporting, and Innovative Management

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149129
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Errors in Clinical Practice: Current Thoughts on Incidence, Reporting, and Innovative Management
Abstract:
Errors in Clinical Practice: Current Thoughts on Incidence, Reporting, and Innovative Management
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Throckmorton, Terry, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
Co-Authors:Jason Etchegaray, PhD; Debora Simmons Bennett, MSN, RN, CCRN, CCNS
Introduction Individually and collectively, nurses shape the delivery of healthcare through clinical practice. Such practice is both supported and negatively impacted by systems within the institutions in which the nurses work. Since publication of the IOM Report, managers throughout the world have increased efforts to detect and diminish the numbers of errors that occur in their institutions. Numerous survey and system analysis studies have been completed to determine why errors occur and to what extent they are reported. As a result of these studies, managers are becoming aware that emphasis on systems is inherently important in preventing errors. It is also evident that full knowledge of the number and type of errors is basic to further investigating the problem and that knowledge of near misses will permit a better understanding of system problems. Current Research Since study respondents have indicated a fear of reprisal when reporting errors, researchers are now focusing increasingly on understanding barriers that might inhibit the reporting of close calls and errors by healthcare providers. It is clear from most of the reports from around the world that lack of trust in the employer and the licensing board may be a significant deterrent to reporting errors. Building systems that incorporate such options as anonymous reporting of errors, multidisciplinary root cause analysis to assess and revise systems, and ultimately, open, nonthreatening reporting of errors is important to solving the problem. Barriers to Reporting and Potential Solutions This presentation focuses on one crucial aspect of close call and error reporting, nurses’ intent to report and perceptions of barriers to reporting. Further, this presentation identifies barriers that might be common in international practice settings, provides an overview of the influence of barriers on reporting and types of errors reported from an international perspective, and discusses approaches to alleviating these barriers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleErrors in Clinical Practice: Current Thoughts on Incidence, Reporting, and Innovative Managementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149129-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Errors in Clinical Practice: Current Thoughts on Incidence, Reporting, and Innovative Management</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Throckmorton, Terry, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tthrockm@mdanderson.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jason Etchegaray, PhD; Debora Simmons Bennett, MSN, RN, CCRN, CCNS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction Individually and collectively, nurses shape the delivery of healthcare through clinical practice. Such practice is both supported and negatively impacted by systems within the institutions in which the nurses work. Since publication of the IOM Report, managers throughout the world have increased efforts to detect and diminish the numbers of errors that occur in their institutions. Numerous survey and system analysis studies have been completed to determine why errors occur and to what extent they are reported. As a result of these studies, managers are becoming aware that emphasis on systems is inherently important in preventing errors. It is also evident that full knowledge of the number and type of errors is basic to further investigating the problem and that knowledge of near misses will permit a better understanding of system problems. Current Research Since study respondents have indicated a fear of reprisal when reporting errors, researchers are now focusing increasingly on understanding barriers that might inhibit the reporting of close calls and errors by healthcare providers. It is clear from most of the reports from around the world that lack of trust in the employer and the licensing board may be a significant deterrent to reporting errors. Building systems that incorporate such options as anonymous reporting of errors, multidisciplinary root cause analysis to assess and revise systems, and ultimately, open, nonthreatening reporting of errors is important to solving the problem. Barriers to Reporting and Potential Solutions This presentation focuses on one crucial aspect of close call and error reporting, nurses&rsquo; intent to report and perceptions of barriers to reporting. Further, this presentation identifies barriers that might be common in international practice settings, provides an overview of the influence of barriers on reporting and types of errors reported from an international perspective, and discusses approaches to alleviating these barriers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:56:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:56:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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