2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149130
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parental Consent and Adolescent Risk Behavior Research
Abstract:
Parental Consent and Adolescent Risk Behavior Research
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Tigges, Beth Baldwin, PhD, RN, CPNP, BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: Researchers studying adolescent risk-behavior in the schools often have the choice of using active or passive parental consent. Active consent requires all parents to return a consent form, regardless of whether they are allowing their children to participate in the research. Passive parental consent requires parents to respond only if they do not want their children to participate. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an analysis of methodological issues related to parental consent in school-based adolescent risk behavior research and to propose recommendations for addressing these issues that are consistent with current legal and ethical standards in the United States. Methods: Review and synthesis of the professional literature related to adolescents and parental consent, federal regulations and guidelines in the United States, and the author's experience presenting these arguments and issues to institutional review boards and funding agencies for over 10 years. Findings: The procedures used for parental consent have implications for a study's participation rates, costs, and selection bias. When active parental consent is required, parental permission is typically obtained for only 30-60% of students, compared to 93-100% when passive consent is used. Extensive follow-up may result in 55-100% of parents giving permission, but at significant cost (typically $20-25 per student). Active consent results in the exclusion of minorities, students having problems in school, and students already engaged in or at risk for problem behaviors. There are strong methodological reasons for using passive parental consent when possible. Current federal regulations include four areas that may be cited to support requests for alterations in parental consent procedures, including the use of passive parental consent. Conclusions: Adolescent health researchers must understand the methodological, legal, and ethical issues related to parental consent to produce high-quality, valid research and to provide input into the development of laws, policies, and regulations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParental Consent and Adolescent Risk Behavior Researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149130-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parental Consent and Adolescent Risk Behavior Research</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tigges, Beth Baldwin, PhD, RN, CPNP, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">btigges@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Researchers studying adolescent risk-behavior in the schools often have the choice of using active or passive parental consent. Active consent requires all parents to return a consent form, regardless of whether they are allowing their children to participate in the research. Passive parental consent requires parents to respond only if they do not want their children to participate. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an analysis of methodological issues related to parental consent in school-based adolescent risk behavior research and to propose recommendations for addressing these issues that are consistent with current legal and ethical standards in the United States. Methods: Review and synthesis of the professional literature related to adolescents and parental consent, federal regulations and guidelines in the United States, and the author's experience presenting these arguments and issues to institutional review boards and funding agencies for over 10 years. Findings: The procedures used for parental consent have implications for a study's participation rates, costs, and selection bias. When active parental consent is required, parental permission is typically obtained for only 30-60% of students, compared to 93-100% when passive consent is used. Extensive follow-up may result in 55-100% of parents giving permission, but at significant cost (typically $20-25 per student). Active consent results in the exclusion of minorities, students having problems in school, and students already engaged in or at risk for problem behaviors. There are strong methodological reasons for using passive parental consent when possible. Current federal regulations include four areas that may be cited to support requests for alterations in parental consent procedures, including the use of passive parental consent. Conclusions: Adolescent health researchers must understand the methodological, legal, and ethical issues related to parental consent to produce high-quality, valid research and to provide input into the development of laws, policies, and regulations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:56:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:56:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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