The Prevalence of Motor Vehicle Accidents in Night Shift Hospital Employees

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149131
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Prevalence of Motor Vehicle Accidents in Night Shift Hospital Employees
Abstract:
The Prevalence of Motor Vehicle Accidents in Night Shift Hospital Employees
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Toon, Sandra J., RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Maryland
Title:Community/Public Health MS Student
Hospital personnel deliver 24 hour care. Working night shift influences sleeping patterns and disrupts circadian rhythms. It is thought to play a major role in causing automobile accidents. Objective: The objective of the study is to describe the prevalence of motor vehicle accidents among night shift workers during the commute after work. Design: A cross-sectional, exploratory design. Population, Sample, Setting: A convenience sample of full-time permanent night-shift hospital workers included nurses, respiratory therapist, unit clerks, housekeeping and ancillary personnel who work between the hours of three p.m. and seven a.m. at a small suburban community hospital (N=50). Concepts or Variables: Risk factors for motor vehicle accidents included sleep prior to working, lengths of commute, naps taken at work and feeling drowsy or sleepy while driving. Past year prevalence of motor vehicle accidents was assessed as well as injury. Methods: A two to five minute written survey questionnaire was distributed to 50 voluntary night shift employees. Participants were ensured their confidentiality and anonymity. A 90% response rate was achieved. Conclusion: Night shift workers have a high risk of motor vehicle accidents after working their shift. This represents a risk to both worker and the health and safety of the public. Implications: Reducing fatigue and sleepiness reduce the risk of motor vehicle accidents in night shift employees. Interventions to reduce risk might include use of scheduled breaks, naps during breaks, limiting double-back shifts, and providing a sleep-room for night shift workers to nap before driving home.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Prevalence of Motor Vehicle Accidents in Night Shift Hospital Employeesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149131-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Prevalence of Motor Vehicle Accidents in Night Shift Hospital Employees</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Toon, Sandra J., RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Maryland</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Community/Public Health MS Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">santoon3@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Hospital personnel deliver 24 hour care. Working night shift influences sleeping patterns and disrupts circadian rhythms. It is thought to play a major role in causing automobile accidents. Objective: The objective of the study is to describe the prevalence of motor vehicle accidents among night shift workers during the commute after work. Design: A cross-sectional, exploratory design. Population, Sample, Setting: A convenience sample of full-time permanent night-shift hospital workers included nurses, respiratory therapist, unit clerks, housekeeping and ancillary personnel who work between the hours of three p.m. and seven a.m. at a small suburban community hospital (N=50). Concepts or Variables: Risk factors for motor vehicle accidents included sleep prior to working, lengths of commute, naps taken at work and feeling drowsy or sleepy while driving. Past year prevalence of motor vehicle accidents was assessed as well as injury. Methods: A two to five minute written survey questionnaire was distributed to 50 voluntary night shift employees. Participants were ensured their confidentiality and anonymity. A 90% response rate was achieved. Conclusion: Night shift workers have a high risk of motor vehicle accidents after working their shift. This represents a risk to both worker and the health and safety of the public. Implications: Reducing fatigue and sleepiness reduce the risk of motor vehicle accidents in night shift employees. Interventions to reduce risk might include use of scheduled breaks, naps during breaks, limiting double-back shifts, and providing a sleep-room for night shift workers to nap before driving home.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:56:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:56:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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