Service Learning: Increasing the Balance between Heads and Hands

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149134
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Service Learning: Increasing the Balance between Heads and Hands
Abstract:
Service Learning: Increasing the Balance between Heads and Hands
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Tritak, Ann B., RN, BS, MA, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:Fairleigh Dickinson University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Christine Mihal, MSN, APRN, BC
This presentation highlights a collaborative project between education and service. To improve their track record of recruiting and retaining nurses for their state-of-the-art oncology center, the agency and university faculty re-engineered the oncology orientation curriculum. This strategy allowed nurse faculty to implement a long-planned design for more hands-on learning for their students. Agency clinical specialists and university faculty collaborated to: 1)design a new curriculum, 2) maximize clinical practice and classroom lectures, 3)develop a pre/post assessment tool, and 4) integrate the ongoing evaluation process. A curriculum was created that emphasized several components germaine to oncology nursing, such as ethical dilemmas, safety, and the enhancement of critical thinking skills. Students and new staff were provided classroom and clinical experiences in this highly specialized area. Students worked closely with other members of the health team treating their assigned clients. This innovative approach to service-learning did not include a preceptor. Instead, university faculty and clinical specialist worked closely with students. Faculty and clinical specialists were always present. This was significant because students did not miss any clinical experiences. Missing clinical time because a preceptor was absent or not available has been identified as a negative outcome of service-learning. This project yielded many positive outcomes: 1) excellent clinical experiences that would not have been possible, 2) hospital education staff were able to evaluate performances of potential applicants for this highly specialized area, and 3) the challenges of the experience influenced several students to accept offers of employment. The agency's workforce increased. In a small but significant way, this project helped to increase the knowledge and skills of senior baccalaureate nursing students, and assisted the medical center in its recruitment efforts to find graduates with a high potential for success in oncology nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleService Learning: Increasing the Balance between Heads and Handsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149134-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Service Learning: Increasing the Balance between Heads and Hands</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tritak, Ann B., RN, BS, MA, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Fairleigh Dickinson University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tritak@fdu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Christine Mihal, MSN, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This presentation highlights a collaborative project between education and service. To improve their track record of recruiting and retaining nurses for their state-of-the-art oncology center, the agency and university faculty re-engineered the oncology orientation curriculum. This strategy allowed nurse faculty to implement a long-planned design for more hands-on learning for their students. Agency clinical specialists and university faculty collaborated to: 1)design a new curriculum, 2) maximize clinical practice and classroom lectures, 3)develop a pre/post assessment tool, and 4) integrate the ongoing evaluation process. A curriculum was created that emphasized several components germaine to oncology nursing, such as ethical dilemmas, safety, and the enhancement of critical thinking skills. Students and new staff were provided classroom and clinical experiences in this highly specialized area. Students worked closely with other members of the health team treating their assigned clients. This innovative approach to service-learning did not include a preceptor. Instead, university faculty and clinical specialist worked closely with students. Faculty and clinical specialists were always present. This was significant because students did not miss any clinical experiences. Missing clinical time because a preceptor was absent or not available has been identified as a negative outcome of service-learning. This project yielded many positive outcomes: 1) excellent clinical experiences that would not have been possible, 2) hospital education staff were able to evaluate performances of potential applicants for this highly specialized area, and 3) the challenges of the experience influenced several students to accept offers of employment. The agency's workforce increased. In a small but significant way, this project helped to increase the knowledge and skills of senior baccalaureate nursing students, and assisted the medical center in its recruitment efforts to find graduates with a high potential for success in oncology nursing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:56:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:56:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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