2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149149
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Experience of Women with Heart Disease
Abstract:
The Experience of Women with Heart Disease
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Williamson, Karen, RN, MScN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Windsor
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Cheri Ann Hernandez, RN, PhD, CDE; Debbie Kane, RN, MScN
Objective: It is known that women as well as men are candidates for myocardial infarction (MI) and that women’s symptoms of angina or MI may be different than those of men. However, a deep understanding of how women experience angina or MI remains unknown. This knowledge is essential for the development of effective educational materials and programs. The purpose of this study was to explicate the experience of living with heart disease in women who have been diagnosed with either angina or MI. Design: A qualitative research design was utilized using focus group methodology. Population, Sample: Women between the ages of 35 and 75 are being recruited to participate in one of four focus groups. Methods: The first focus group was held with 7 women, four of whom already had an MI. All focus groups will be moderated by an experienced focus group researcher, audiotaped, and transcribed verbatim. Members of the research team will analyze the data for themes separately, and then come together and agree on the analysis and questions for the next focus group. Findings: The results of the first focus group session indicate that there are three major processes, each containing several sub-processes, in the experience of heart disease: delaying, denying, and restricting. Contrary to the traditional belief that delaying entry to the health care system is a passive process, participants described delaying as a very active, meaningful process. Conclusions: Preliminary conclusions are that women very actively construct their knowledge and experience with heart disease and frequently do so without the help of nurses, physicians and other health care professionals, although this input is desired. Implications: The experiences of these seven women reflect the need for changes in the health care relationship, content and design of health care messages, and delivery of cardiac prevention and aftercare programs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Experience of Women with Heart Diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149149-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Experience of Women with Heart Disease</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Williamson, Karen, RN, MScN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Windsor</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">karenw@uwindsor.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cheri Ann Hernandez, RN, PhD, CDE; Debbie Kane, RN, MScN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: It is known that women as well as men are candidates for myocardial infarction (MI) and that women&rsquo;s symptoms of angina or MI may be different than those of men. However, a deep understanding of how women experience angina or MI remains unknown. This knowledge is essential for the development of effective educational materials and programs. The purpose of this study was to explicate the experience of living with heart disease in women who have been diagnosed with either angina or MI. Design: A qualitative research design was utilized using focus group methodology. Population, Sample: Women between the ages of 35 and 75 are being recruited to participate in one of four focus groups. Methods: The first focus group was held with 7 women, four of whom already had an MI. All focus groups will be moderated by an experienced focus group researcher, audiotaped, and transcribed verbatim. Members of the research team will analyze the data for themes separately, and then come together and agree on the analysis and questions for the next focus group. Findings: The results of the first focus group session indicate that there are three major processes, each containing several sub-processes, in the experience of heart disease: delaying, denying, and restricting. Contrary to the traditional belief that delaying entry to the health care system is a passive process, participants described delaying as a very active, meaningful process. Conclusions: Preliminary conclusions are that women very actively construct their knowledge and experience with heart disease and frequently do so without the help of nurses, physicians and other health care professionals, although this input is desired. Implications: The experiences of these seven women reflect the need for changes in the health care relationship, content and design of health care messages, and delivery of cardiac prevention and aftercare programs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:57:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:57:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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