Building the Capacity for Sustainable Nursing Education in a Developing Country

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149150
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Building the Capacity for Sustainable Nursing Education in a Developing Country
Abstract:
Building the Capacity for Sustainable Nursing Education in a Developing Country
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Willingham, Gloria Jean, PhD, RN, BSN, MNSc
P.I. Institution Name:Fielding Graduate Institute
Title:Associate Dean
CHALLENGES IN A DEVELOPING COUNTRY: Sustainable capacity-building in developing countries presents many challenges. Adapting to local culture, imported resources,imposed international standards, politics, security, balance of power, languages, and religion are a few examples. In nursing, these challenges may be further complicated by the absence of regulation, licensure, and accreditation; and an insufficient number of nurses to drive the system. These and other related issues have not historically been engaged in nursing studies. Subsequently, nurses may be entering international educator roles without the benefit of academic or experiential preparation. This is occuring at a time when Nurse educators are needed to take on the role of international educator and mentor. CAPACITY BUILDING AND SUSTAINABILITY: This presentation expands the nursing dialogue to include capacity building challenges as experienced by the author while working as the Head of Service in a major hospital and research center in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). A twelve-month hospital-based post-graduate diploma program in nursing education was implemented to prepare international nurses for the role of clinical instructor. Twenty-one nurses representative of eleven nations, multiple religions, and five native languages completed the program. Four sustainable projects were developed and implemented locally, and introduced throughout the Gulf Council Countries. LEADERSHIP IMPLICATIONS: The program was analyzed based on an international literature review, student and staff comments; and planning/implementation records. Planning and implementation scenarios were reviewed using a capacity-development framework. Identified strategies may be of value to educators in similarly situated countries. Additional discussions may be of importance in generating researchable questions, and the development of curricula to prepare nurses to work internationally.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBuilding the Capacity for Sustainable Nursing Education in a Developing Countryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149150-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Building the Capacity for Sustainable Nursing Education in a Developing Country</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Willingham, Gloria Jean, PhD, RN, BSN, MNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Fielding Graduate Institute</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gwillingham@fielding.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">CHALLENGES IN A DEVELOPING COUNTRY: Sustainable capacity-building in developing countries presents many challenges. Adapting to local culture, imported resources,imposed international standards, politics, security, balance of power, languages, and religion are a few examples. In nursing, these challenges may be further complicated by the absence of regulation, licensure, and accreditation; and an insufficient number of nurses to drive the system. These and other related issues have not historically been engaged in nursing studies. Subsequently, nurses may be entering international educator roles without the benefit of academic or experiential preparation. This is occuring at a time when Nurse educators are needed to take on the role of international educator and mentor. CAPACITY BUILDING AND SUSTAINABILITY: This presentation expands the nursing dialogue to include capacity building challenges as experienced by the author while working as the Head of Service in a major hospital and research center in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). A twelve-month hospital-based post-graduate diploma program in nursing education was implemented to prepare international nurses for the role of clinical instructor. Twenty-one nurses representative of eleven nations, multiple religions, and five native languages completed the program. Four sustainable projects were developed and implemented locally, and introduced throughout the Gulf Council Countries. LEADERSHIP IMPLICATIONS: The program was analyzed based on an international literature review, student and staff comments; and planning/implementation records. Planning and implementation scenarios were reviewed using a capacity-development framework. Identified strategies may be of value to educators in similarly situated countries. Additional discussions may be of importance in generating researchable questions, and the development of curricula to prepare nurses to work internationally.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:57:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:57:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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