Lifetime Trauma, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Clusters, and Physical Health in Women in Intimate, Abusive Relationships

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149154
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Lifetime Trauma, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Clusters, and Physical Health in Women in Intimate, Abusive Relationships
Abstract:
Lifetime Trauma, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Clusters, and Physical Health in Women in Intimate, Abusive Relationships
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Woods, Stephanie J., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Akron
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:N. Margaret Wineman, RN, PhD, CS
Objective: Violence against women is a global health problem. The purpose of this presentation is to examine the relationships between violent and non-violent lifetime trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder and its symptom clusters of avoidance, intrusion/re-experiencing, and hyperarousal, and physical health symptoms in currently abused women. Design: A cross-sectional, predictive-correlational design was used. Sample, Setting, Years: A convenience sample of 126 abused women (48% Caucasian, 37% African American, 4% Hispanic, and 5% American Indian/Alaskan Native or Asian/Pacific Islander), who have been in an abusive intimate relationship an average of 6 years, was recruited in 2002. Mean age was 34.05 (SD 9.07) years. Concepts: Six types of violent and eight types of non-violent lifetime traumas were assessed. PTSD and its symptom clusters were measured by the PSS. Physical health symptoms were assessed using a 40-item physical health survey. Methods: Descriptive, correlational, and multiple regression analyses were used. Findings: The abused women averaged 5.5 traumas throughout their lifetime. Violent trauma was correlated with PTSD symptom severity (r= .24, p Conclusions: These ethnically diverse women, who were traumatized throughout their lifetime, experienced an array of physical and emotional health problems. Although this is a US population, violence against women is global, and it is likely that the effects of violence on women’s health are experienced worldwide. Implications: The results highlight the need for healthcare practitioners in all settings to assess for lifetime trauma. Research is needed that concurrently examines physiologic and psychosocial responses to traumatic events. Supported by NINR (07761).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLifetime Trauma, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Clusters, and Physical Health in Women in Intimate, Abusive Relationshipsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149154-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Lifetime Trauma, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Clusters, and Physical Health in Women in Intimate, Abusive Relationships</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Woods, Stephanie J., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sw5@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">N. Margaret Wineman, RN, PhD, CS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Violence against women is a global health problem. The purpose of this presentation is to examine the relationships between violent and non-violent lifetime trauma, post-traumatic stress disorder and its symptom clusters of avoidance, intrusion/re-experiencing, and hyperarousal, and physical health symptoms in currently abused women. Design: A cross-sectional, predictive-correlational design was used. Sample, Setting, Years: A convenience sample of 126 abused women (48% Caucasian, 37% African American, 4% Hispanic, and 5% American Indian/Alaskan Native or Asian/Pacific Islander), who have been in an abusive intimate relationship an average of 6 years, was recruited in 2002. Mean age was 34.05 (SD 9.07) years. Concepts: Six types of violent and eight types of non-violent lifetime traumas were assessed. PTSD and its symptom clusters were measured by the PSS. Physical health symptoms were assessed using a 40-item physical health survey. Methods: Descriptive, correlational, and multiple regression analyses were used. Findings: The abused women averaged 5.5 traumas throughout their lifetime. Violent trauma was correlated with PTSD symptom severity (r= .24, p Conclusions: These ethnically diverse women, who were traumatized throughout their lifetime, experienced an array of physical and emotional health problems. Although this is a US population, violence against women is global, and it is likely that the effects of violence on women&rsquo;s health are experienced worldwide. Implications: The results highlight the need for healthcare practitioners in all settings to assess for lifetime trauma. Research is needed that concurrently examines physiologic and psychosocial responses to traumatic events. Supported by NINR (07761).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:57:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:57:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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