Educating Nurses for Leadership: What Does It Mean and How Do We Get There?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149158
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Educating Nurses for Leadership: What Does It Mean and How Do We Get There?
Abstract:
Educating Nurses for Leadership: What Does It Mean and How Do We Get There?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Zanchetta, Margareth Santos, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Queen's University
Co-Authors:Rosamund Woodhouse, PhD
Traditional conceptions of leadership have been based on individual traits and behaviours and, more recently, on relational models. Emerging models, derived from critical theory and from cultures with different patterns of social interactions, highlight implicit assumptions about power, authority and social/organizational control that underlie conventional models. These assumptions may be incompatible with the changing professional values, role, and position of nursing within our healthcare system, or in the context of our increasingly diverse society and globalized world. Our goal is to develop a more appropriate framework to inform the goals, design and process of leadership education in nursing. A key feature of conventional approaches to leadership education is the assumption that the leader has a position in a management or other power structure (indeed, leadership training is often reserved for those recruited or promoted to such positions). A natural consequence is that leaders become distanced from the communities their organization serves, and can lose sight of important issues and needs. One response is to apply pressure for ‘social responsiveness’. An alternative is to focus on educating all learners to assume an ethical stance that emphasizes their roles and responsibilities as ‘citizens’ who must contribute to the improvement of their collective society. For nurses, this means extending the scope of their professional role and practice beyond the application of technical medical knowledge and skills to the individual patient, toward proactive involvement in addressing broader issues in their organizations and communities. To educate and support the development of such nurse leaders, educators must in turn develop meaningful learning goals and methods that encourage critical inquiry and advocacy, and promote nurses' development of an ethical stance and supporting skills to initiate, enact and maintain change in their professional environment and practices. We explore how these directions can be achieved in this paper.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEducating Nurses for Leadership: What Does It Mean and How Do We Get There?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149158-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Educating Nurses for Leadership: What Does It Mean and How Do We Get There?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zanchetta, Margareth Santos, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Queen's University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">zanchetm@post.queensu.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Rosamund Woodhouse, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Traditional conceptions of leadership have been based on individual traits and behaviours and, more recently, on relational models. Emerging models, derived from critical theory and from cultures with different patterns of social interactions, highlight implicit assumptions about power, authority and social/organizational control that underlie conventional models. These assumptions may be incompatible with the changing professional values, role, and position of nursing within our healthcare system, or in the context of our increasingly diverse society and globalized world. Our goal is to develop a more appropriate framework to inform the goals, design and process of leadership education in nursing. A key feature of conventional approaches to leadership education is the assumption that the leader has a position in a management or other power structure (indeed, leadership training is often reserved for those recruited or promoted to such positions). A natural consequence is that leaders become distanced from the communities their organization serves, and can lose sight of important issues and needs. One response is to apply pressure for &lsquo;social responsiveness&rsquo;. An alternative is to focus on educating all learners to assume an ethical stance that emphasizes their roles and responsibilities as &lsquo;citizens&rsquo; who must contribute to the improvement of their collective society. For nurses, this means extending the scope of their professional role and practice beyond the application of technical medical knowledge and skills to the individual patient, toward proactive involvement in addressing broader issues in their organizations and communities. To educate and support the development of such nurse leaders, educators must in turn develop meaningful learning goals and methods that encourage critical inquiry and advocacy, and promote nurses' development of an ethical stance and supporting skills to initiate, enact and maintain change in their professional environment and practices. We explore how these directions can be achieved in this paper.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:57:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:57:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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