Cognitive Levels of Multiple-Choice Items on Teacher-Made Tests in Nursing Education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149166
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cognitive Levels of Multiple-Choice Items on Teacher-Made Tests in Nursing Education
Abstract:
Cognitive Levels of Multiple-Choice Items on Teacher-Made Tests in Nursing Education
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Cross, Kathleen
P.I. Institution Name:Madonna University
This study examined the types and cognitive complexity of items on teacher-made tests from associate degree and baccalaureate nursing programs throughout the United States. Faculty from randomly-selected nursing programs were asked to submit two teacher-made final examinations. One hundred thirty examinations were received from 66 associate degree and baccalaureate degree nursing programs in 31 states. Multiple-choice items were the most common type (91.9%) of item submitted. Other item types in order of popularity were mathematics (2.4%), matching (2.4%), true/ false (1.3%), short answer (1.1%), and essay (0.8%). All essay items students were on baccalaureate program tests. Group and take- home tests were excluded. Cognitive levels of multiple-choice test items from 110 test documents were rated by two experienced nursing educators. Inter-rater agreement was 61%. When raters disagreed, a third judge determined the final rating level according to pre-established criteria. Once ratings for individual items were determined, a mean rating was calculated for all multiple-choice items on the examination. Paired sample t tests showed an increase in cognitive level from beginning to final-semester courses for associate degree programs (t[31]= -3.309, p= .005), but not for baccalaureate programs (t[16]= .053, p = .959). Independent samples t tests revealed no significant difference in cognitive level between beginning-semester exams between the two types of programs (t[56]= .448, p = .656). The mean cognitive index for multiple-choice items on associate degree program final-semester exams, however, was higher than that for final-semester baccalaureate exams when all exams were compared (t [50]=2.683, p = .010). Final-semester baccalaureate exams covered different types of courses, utilized fewer multiple-choice items and employed a greater variety of item types. There was, however, no statistically significant difference in cognitive levels of items between programs when final-semester baccalaureate exams (n=13) which contained multiple-choice items but no essay items were compared to those from final-semester associate degree exams (n=33) which were similar in format (t [44]=1.988, p= .057). Overall, over half (51.3%) of all multiple-choice items were judged to be at the lowest cognitive level, with most of the remainder (42.4%) at the second level, and fewest (6.2%) at the third (or highest) level. Although several tests had a large number of the highest level multiple-choice items, there are probably fewer of these higher-level items than faculty authors believe. Faculty need to look critically at their own tests and consult with knowledgeable colleagues to assure that sufficient higher-level items are being included.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCognitive Levels of Multiple-Choice Items on Teacher-Made Tests in Nursing Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149166-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cognitive Levels of Multiple-Choice Items on Teacher-Made Tests in Nursing Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cross, Kathleen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Madonna University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kcross@madonna.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study examined the types and cognitive complexity of items on teacher-made tests from associate degree and baccalaureate nursing programs throughout the United States. Faculty from randomly-selected nursing programs were asked to submit two teacher-made final examinations. One hundred thirty examinations were received from 66 associate degree and baccalaureate degree nursing programs in 31 states. Multiple-choice items were the most common type (91.9%) of item submitted. Other item types in order of popularity were mathematics (2.4%), matching (2.4%), true/ false (1.3%), short answer (1.1%), and essay (0.8%). All essay items students were on baccalaureate program tests. Group and take- home tests were excluded. Cognitive levels of multiple-choice test items from 110 test documents were rated by two experienced nursing educators. Inter-rater agreement was 61%. When raters disagreed, a third judge determined the final rating level according to pre-established criteria. Once ratings for individual items were determined, a mean rating was calculated for all multiple-choice items on the examination. Paired sample t tests showed an increase in cognitive level from beginning to final-semester courses for associate degree programs (t[31]= -3.309, p= .005), but not for baccalaureate programs (t[16]= .053, p = .959). Independent samples t tests revealed no significant difference in cognitive level between beginning-semester exams between the two types of programs (t[56]= .448, p = .656). The mean cognitive index for multiple-choice items on associate degree program final-semester exams, however, was higher than that for final-semester baccalaureate exams when all exams were compared (t [50]=2.683, p = .010). Final-semester baccalaureate exams covered different types of courses, utilized fewer multiple-choice items and employed a greater variety of item types. There was, however, no statistically significant difference in cognitive levels of items between programs when final-semester baccalaureate exams (n=13) which contained multiple-choice items but no essay items were compared to those from final-semester associate degree exams (n=33) which were similar in format (t [44]=1.988, p= .057). Overall, over half (51.3%) of all multiple-choice items were judged to be at the lowest cognitive level, with most of the remainder (42.4%) at the second level, and fewest (6.2%) at the third (or highest) level. Although several tests had a large number of the highest level multiple-choice items, there are probably fewer of these higher-level items than faculty authors believe. Faculty need to look critically at their own tests and consult with knowledgeable colleagues to assure that sufficient higher-level items are being included.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:57:19Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:57:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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