Program Evaluation Project Fosters A Community of Faculty and Student Scholars

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149167
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Program Evaluation Project Fosters A Community of Faculty and Student Scholars
Abstract:
Program Evaluation Project Fosters A Community of Faculty and Student Scholars
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Heinrich, Kathleen
P.I. Institution Name:University of Hartford
After this presentation, participants will be able to: 1. describe the design of a program evaluation project that involved faculty and masters students in collecting and analyzing qualitative, focus group data while gathering outcome data from graduating students, 2. assess the applicability of this design for their own programs. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this presentation is to share an innovative, hermeneutic, program evaluation project. Schools of nursing across the country are searching for qualitative and naturalistic measures of programmatic outcomes to evaluate the effectiveness of their curricula. According to Nancy Diekelmann (1991), curriculum is a living phenomena that includes students' relationships with faculty as well as teaching strategies, coursework, and clinical practica. This project simultaneously involved faculty and masters students in collecting and analyzing qualitative, focus group data while gathering evaluation data from graduating students to empirically ground curricular change. DESIGN, SAMPLE & METHOD: Both an educational innovation and a collaborative research strategy, this project engaged UH faculty and masters students as co-researchers in exploring the lived experiences of nurses graduating from the RN-BSN and MSN program. In Fall 1999 an internal grant and a successful review by the University Human Subjects Committee allowed three faculty members to initiate this project by inviting two graduate students to join them as researchers. In Spring 2000, all masters students enrolled in their final research course were invited to join this project. Using the Bennett Method, 17 masters student volunteers actually learned how to facilitate focus groups by participating in a focus group that was conducted by the researchers. Answering the same questions they would subsequently pose to groups of participating students allowed them to tell their own stories thereby deepening their reflexivity. In the process they became aware of their biases and refined the interview schedule of questions. In April 2000, master’s student facilitators conducted 8 focus groups composed of a total of 61 graduating, RN-BSN and MSN students. All group discussions were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. In October 2000, the researchers trained master’s student facilitators to analyze focus group transcripts following the steps outlined by Morgan and Kreuger (1999). Teamed with a researcher, master’s student facilitators analyzed the data from the focus group(s) they conducted. Salient themes were surfaced using Van Manen's (1990) phenomenological approach. Researchers and master’s student facilitators compared themes and recommendations for programmatic changes across groups. They are currently collaborating on disseminating the findings. FINDINGS: The most salient finding is that Diekelmann's broad definition of curriculum, as relationships between faculty and students, is supported by this research. After participating in this collaborative project from design to dissemination with faculty, master’s students see themselves as researchers within a community of scholarly caring. Examples of empirically grounded, curricular revisions will be shared that have as much to do with faculty-student relationships as they do with teaching strategies or course design. CONCLUSIONS & IMPLICATIONS: Bunkers (2000) maintains that nurse-scholars in the 21rst century must be learned and be mentored by communities of faculty and student scholars. This project can serve as a model for other nurse educators who wish to foster students', scholarly development by collaborating with them in educational, evaluation research that can guide the revisioning of curricula.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProgram Evaluation Project Fosters A Community of Faculty and Student Scholarsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149167-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Program Evaluation Project Fosters A Community of Faculty and Student Scholars</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Heinrich, Kathleen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Hartford</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">drkth@worldnet.att.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">After this presentation, participants will be able to: 1. describe the design of a program evaluation project that involved faculty and masters students in collecting and analyzing qualitative, focus group data while gathering outcome data from graduating students, 2. assess the applicability of this design for their own programs. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this presentation is to share an innovative, hermeneutic, program evaluation project. Schools of nursing across the country are searching for qualitative and naturalistic measures of programmatic outcomes to evaluate the effectiveness of their curricula. According to Nancy Diekelmann (1991), curriculum is a living phenomena that includes students' relationships with faculty as well as teaching strategies, coursework, and clinical practica. This project simultaneously involved faculty and masters students in collecting and analyzing qualitative, focus group data while gathering evaluation data from graduating students to empirically ground curricular change. DESIGN, SAMPLE &amp; METHOD: Both an educational innovation and a collaborative research strategy, this project engaged UH faculty and masters students as co-researchers in exploring the lived experiences of nurses graduating from the RN-BSN and MSN program. In Fall 1999 an internal grant and a successful review by the University Human Subjects Committee allowed three faculty members to initiate this project by inviting two graduate students to join them as researchers. In Spring 2000, all masters students enrolled in their final research course were invited to join this project. Using the Bennett Method, 17 masters student volunteers actually learned how to facilitate focus groups by participating in a focus group that was conducted by the researchers. Answering the same questions they would subsequently pose to groups of participating students allowed them to tell their own stories thereby deepening their reflexivity. In the process they became aware of their biases and refined the interview schedule of questions. In April 2000, master&rsquo;s student facilitators conducted 8 focus groups composed of a total of 61 graduating, RN-BSN and MSN students. All group discussions were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. In October 2000, the researchers trained master&rsquo;s student facilitators to analyze focus group transcripts following the steps outlined by Morgan and Kreuger (1999). Teamed with a researcher, master&rsquo;s student facilitators analyzed the data from the focus group(s) they conducted. Salient themes were surfaced using Van Manen's (1990) phenomenological approach. Researchers and master&rsquo;s student facilitators compared themes and recommendations for programmatic changes across groups. They are currently collaborating on disseminating the findings. FINDINGS: The most salient finding is that Diekelmann's broad definition of curriculum, as relationships between faculty and students, is supported by this research. After participating in this collaborative project from design to dissemination with faculty, master&rsquo;s students see themselves as researchers within a community of scholarly caring. Examples of empirically grounded, curricular revisions will be shared that have as much to do with faculty-student relationships as they do with teaching strategies or course design. CONCLUSIONS &amp; IMPLICATIONS: Bunkers (2000) maintains that nurse-scholars in the 21rst century must be learned and be mentored by communities of faculty and student scholars. This project can serve as a model for other nurse educators who wish to foster students', scholarly development by collaborating with them in educational, evaluation research that can guide the revisioning of curricula.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:57:20Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:57:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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