Health Motivation: A Determinant of Older Adults' Attendance at Health Promotion Programs

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149171
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Motivation: A Determinant of Older Adults' Attendance at Health Promotion Programs
Abstract:
Health Motivation: A Determinant of Older Adults' Attendance at Health Promotion Programs
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Loeb, Susan
P.I. Institution Name:Pennsylvania State University
Objective: The primary purpose of conducting this study was to determine if there is a significant relationship between health motivation and participation in health promotion programs in community dwelling older adults. Design: A survey research design was used. Sample: A convenience sample of 106 community dwelling elders was employed. Inclusion criteria required that participants live independently in the community and be at least 60 years of age, able to read and write English, and without apparent cognitive impairment. Setting: In order to ensure diversity with respect to education and income, participants were recruited at two blood pressure screenings sponsored by a home health care agency and held at senior citizens' apartment buildings, an educational program about the aging eye that was held at a hospital, a private-pay retirement village, and a senior citizens' center. Names of Variables or Concept: Participation in community health promotion programs and health motivation were the variables for the primary research question. A variety of demographic variables were examined in the secondary research questions. Measurements/Instruments: Health motivation was measured using Cox's (1985) Health Self-Determinism Index and participation in health promotion programs was measured by tallying the self-reported number of programs attended within the past year by each individual. A general information and demographics questionnaire also was administered. Findings: Intrinsically motivated elders attended fewer programs (p<.01) than those who were more extrinsically motivated. Higher educational level (p<.001) and fewer health problems (p<.01) emerged as significant predictor variables for intrinsic health motivation, and those with less formal education attended more health promotion programs (p<.05). Conclusions: The finding that participants who were more intrinsically motivated attended fewer health promotion programs supports the notion those who do attend health promotion programs are the extrinsically motivated individuals that need those programs most. The significant relationships found between specific demographic variables (e.g. education and number of health problems), health motivation, and amount of participation in health promotion programs provides useful information to aid in preparing programs that better meet the specific needs of elders. Implications: More externally motivated older adults may gain greater benefit from nurses providing them with reinforcement and encouragement for participating in healthy activities, while information, guidance, and choice may be more appropriate for intrinsically motivated elders. Further research is needed, including replication of this study with a larger, more diverse sample, and with consideration of health promoting behaviors beyond formal programs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Motivation: A Determinant of Older Adults' Attendance at Health Promotion Programsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149171-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Motivation: A Determinant of Older Adults' Attendance at Health Promotion Programs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Loeb, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Pennsylvania State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">svl100@psu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The primary purpose of conducting this study was to determine if there is a significant relationship between health motivation and participation in health promotion programs in community dwelling older adults. Design: A survey research design was used. Sample: A convenience sample of 106 community dwelling elders was employed. Inclusion criteria required that participants live independently in the community and be at least 60 years of age, able to read and write English, and without apparent cognitive impairment. Setting: In order to ensure diversity with respect to education and income, participants were recruited at two blood pressure screenings sponsored by a home health care agency and held at senior citizens' apartment buildings, an educational program about the aging eye that was held at a hospital, a private-pay retirement village, and a senior citizens' center. Names of Variables or Concept: Participation in community health promotion programs and health motivation were the variables for the primary research question. A variety of demographic variables were examined in the secondary research questions. Measurements/Instruments: Health motivation was measured using Cox's (1985) Health Self-Determinism Index and participation in health promotion programs was measured by tallying the self-reported number of programs attended within the past year by each individual. A general information and demographics questionnaire also was administered. Findings: Intrinsically motivated elders attended fewer programs (p&lt;.01) than those who were more extrinsically motivated. Higher educational level (p&lt;.001) and fewer health problems (p&lt;.01) emerged as significant predictor variables for intrinsic health motivation, and those with less formal education attended more health promotion programs (p&lt;.05). Conclusions: The finding that participants who were more intrinsically motivated attended fewer health promotion programs supports the notion those who do attend health promotion programs are the extrinsically motivated individuals that need those programs most. The significant relationships found between specific demographic variables (e.g. education and number of health problems), health motivation, and amount of participation in health promotion programs provides useful information to aid in preparing programs that better meet the specific needs of elders. Implications: More externally motivated older adults may gain greater benefit from nurses providing them with reinforcement and encouragement for participating in healthy activities, while information, guidance, and choice may be more appropriate for intrinsically motivated elders. Further research is needed, including replication of this study with a larger, more diverse sample, and with consideration of health promoting behaviors beyond formal programs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:57:24Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:57:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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