Privacy in surgical wards: Realisation in five European countries

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149174
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Privacy in surgical wards: Realisation in five European countries
Abstract:
Privacy in surgical wards: Realisation in five European countries
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Leino-Kilpi, Helena
P.I. Institution Name:University of Turku
Title:Researcher
Objective: to describe the realisation of the privacy in surgical wards in Finland, Germany, Greece, Spain and UK (Scotland). Design: Privacy is one of the important concepts in nursing ethics. It has to do with the patients’ rights which have earned special emphasis during 1990s in Europe. Realisation of privacy in this study has been analysed from the perspective of patients and nurses. Sample: the data has been collected by parallel questionnaires from patients (all together 1454; n=464 in Finland, 173 Spain, 275 Greece, 254 Germany, 288 Scotland) and nurses (all together 1276; n=358 in Finland, 229 Spain, 222 Greece, 205 Germany, 262 Scotland). Setting: the data has been collected in surgical wards. Permission was given according national ethical standards. Surgical patients answered in the questionnaire on the last day of their hospital stay (mean of hospital staying varied between 6.6 days in Finland and 14.12 in Spain). Nurses’ data was collected among educated nursing staff during the same time period. Concepts: privacy has been defined by using two dimensions: physical and social-informational. Instruments: the instruments were created in collaboration between the participating countries, translated using the standard double-checking procedure and piloted in every country. Findings: there are statistically significant differences in the realisation of the privacy in different countries. The best realisation among patients was in Finland (mean 4.4) and worst in Greece (mean 2.36). Among nurses, the best realisation was in Scotland (mean 4.05) and Finland (mean 4.03) and worst in Greece (mean 3.05). From perspective of the individual items, knocking on the door of patients’ room (physical privacy) and disclosing the information about medication to other patients had tow lowest scores. Between patients and nurses there were statistically differences in every country. In all other countries except Greece, patients evaluated the realisation better than nurses. Conclusions: conclusions can be made for each individual countries and generally. Differences between countries can be partly explained by the cultural differences, differences in education and health care organisation. It is, however, important for nurses to share the same ethical value basis, because of that all these countries belong to European Union, which form a common work market also for nurses. Differences between patients and nurses should be studied further, because they can have an important influence to the confidential relationship between nurses and patients, and have also influence to the outcomes of nursing interventions. In further studies, also other health care professionals and relatives of the patients should be included.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrivacy in surgical wards: Realisation in five European countriesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149174-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Privacy in surgical wards: Realisation in five European countries</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Leino-Kilpi, Helena</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Turku</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Researcher</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">helena.leino-kilpi@utu.fi</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: to describe the realisation of the privacy in surgical wards in Finland, Germany, Greece, Spain and UK (Scotland). Design: Privacy is one of the important concepts in nursing ethics. It has to do with the patients&rsquo; rights which have earned special emphasis during 1990s in Europe. Realisation of privacy in this study has been analysed from the perspective of patients and nurses. Sample: the data has been collected by parallel questionnaires from patients (all together 1454; n=464 in Finland, 173 Spain, 275 Greece, 254 Germany, 288 Scotland) and nurses (all together 1276; n=358 in Finland, 229 Spain, 222 Greece, 205 Germany, 262 Scotland). Setting: the data has been collected in surgical wards. Permission was given according national ethical standards. Surgical patients answered in the questionnaire on the last day of their hospital stay (mean of hospital staying varied between 6.6 days in Finland and 14.12 in Spain). Nurses&rsquo; data was collected among educated nursing staff during the same time period. Concepts: privacy has been defined by using two dimensions: physical and social-informational. Instruments: the instruments were created in collaboration between the participating countries, translated using the standard double-checking procedure and piloted in every country. Findings: there are statistically significant differences in the realisation of the privacy in different countries. The best realisation among patients was in Finland (mean 4.4) and worst in Greece (mean 2.36). Among nurses, the best realisation was in Scotland (mean 4.05) and Finland (mean 4.03) and worst in Greece (mean 3.05). From perspective of the individual items, knocking on the door of patients&rsquo; room (physical privacy) and disclosing the information about medication to other patients had tow lowest scores. Between patients and nurses there were statistically differences in every country. In all other countries except Greece, patients evaluated the realisation better than nurses. Conclusions: conclusions can be made for each individual countries and generally. Differences between countries can be partly explained by the cultural differences, differences in education and health care organisation. It is, however, important for nurses to share the same ethical value basis, because of that all these countries belong to European Union, which form a common work market also for nurses. Differences between patients and nurses should be studied further, because they can have an important influence to the confidential relationship between nurses and patients, and have also influence to the outcomes of nursing interventions. In further studies, also other health care professionals and relatives of the patients should be included.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:57:28Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:57:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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